Thursday, September 26, 2013

Laugh a Little

   bonding,boys,brothers,childhood,children,Fotolia,friends,friendships,jokes,joking,kids,laughing,laughs,laughter,males,Photographs,secrets,siblings,whispering,whispers 
You may have fond memories of your favorite comic book from childhood, or perhaps you still read them. If so, then you know how entertaining they can be. 

Some comics are aimed at adult readers, while others appeal to children. Some are perfect for children and adults to read together.  While most are good for a chuckle, some are downright hilarious. They seem funnier the more accurately they target some aspect of life we find frustrating.  

In the Casual Day Has Gone Too Far author Scott Adams takes you into the private life of Dilbert, an engineer at a big company.  Most of the action takes place in his office where you see him interact with his fellow cubicle dwellers and navigate his company's insane bureaucracy.   
    
On a lighter note the Calvin and Hobbes comic books by Bill Watterson focus on those thorny situations and fears more characteristic of childhood.  But don't be fooled, many of Calvin's problems are mirrored in our adult world and we can learn a little from watching the way he manages to handle them.  The Calvin and Hobbes books are a great choice for parents and children to read together.  Calvin’s adventures with his stuffed animal Hobbes will hold a child's attention and help build a strong and nuanced vocabulary. 

Do you remember the Mad comic books or Doonesbury?  If you do you'll probably get a kick out of Mad About the Sixties by "The Usual Gang of Idiots" or Flashbacks: Twenty-five Years of Doonesbury by G. B. Trudeau.   More quirky, raw, and political than Dilbert or Calvin and Hobbes, these comics look at the underside of day-to-day life in the old days, including the angst of being a teenager in the days of Woodstock.  

The next time you need a chuckle, check out a comic book! Looking for ideas? Stop by the Warrenton library and browse our comic book display September 25 - 30.  

Jeanne @ Warrenton Reference

To learn more about the library's collection, programs or events, visit our website or follow us on Facebook     

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Growing Your Savings





The September 2013 issue of Consumer Reports has several interesting feature articles.  "Grow Your Savings" has tips on how to make more money with your 401(k).  Even if you're not close to retirement, you may find useful information here.  Another article has ten tips for cutting drug costs, even for persons who have insurance.  "Your safer-surgery survival guide" lists higher and lower-rated hospitals for five common surgeries, such as knee replacement and coronary angioplasty.  It also has a checklist for "six steps to safer surgery."

If you're a person who likes to start the day off with coffee, check out the ratings for pod coffeemakers (single-serve machines).  Or, if you prefer to start the day with a shake or smoothie, the ratings for blenders might interest you.

Other useful articles in this issue are:
  • "Far-fetched fast food"--did you know that Johnny Rockets Big Apple Shake contains an entire slice of apple pie?
  • Ratings for frozen pizzas
  • Ratings for high-fiber cereals
  • Ratings for streaming media players, which allow you to watch TV episodes and movies from Netflix and other services
Each branch of the Fauquier County Library has the print issues of Consumer Reports from 2009 up to the current issue. The Find It Virginia databases have an index to the issues from February 1, 1976 to the current issue, and the full-text of the reviews from January 1, 1999 to June 1, 2009. You can access Find It Virginia from any library computer, or from home with your valid Fauquier County Public Library card.

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

If You Like Jude Deveraux ...

We are often asked for suggestions and recommendations; some patrons are looking for a specific genre, others have favorite authors they stick to. If you are looking for recommendations based on the authors you enjoy, check out our "Read Alikes".  You can find them at the reference desk, or browse Book Notes for ideas and suggestions from library staff, as well as best seller lists and other resources and tools. 

This week we feature Read Alikes for Jude Deveraux.  If you like Jude Deveraux's books, which include historical fiction, romance, and interesting character relationships, you might like these authors:

Blake, Jennifer
Coffman, Virginia
Cookson, Catherine
Coulter, Catherine
Dailey, Janet
Garwood, Julie
Hooper, Kay
Howard, Linda
Krentz, Jayne Ann
Kurland, Lynn
Lindsey, Johanna
McNaught, Judith
Quick, Amanda
Rice, Luanne
Roberts, Nora
Small, Bertrice
Spencer, LaVyrle
Steel, Danielle
Stone, Katherine
Thomas, Rosie

Jude Deveraux's website includes the latest information about her books.

Happy reading! 

The staff @ Warrenton Reference

To learn more about the library's collection, programs or events, visit our website or follow us on Facebook     

Monday, September 16, 2013

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 9/15/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Never Go Back by Lee Child
2. The Mayan Secrets by Clive Cussler
3. The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith       
4. Styxx by Sherrilyn Kenyon |
5. Inferno by Dan Brown                                
6. Dark Lycan by Christine Feehan        
7. And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini                  
8. Maddaddam by Margaret Atwood                                  
9. How the Light Gets In by Louise Penny                            
10. Mistress by James Patterson                                        
11. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                            
12. The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty                     
13. The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon                      
14. Night Film by Marisha Pessl                                      
15. The Whole Enchilada by Diane Mott Davidson                  

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Si-Cology 1 by Si Robertson with Mark Schlabach
2. Liberty Amendments by Mark R. Levin
3. Happy, Happy, Happy by Phil Robertson with Mark Schlabach    
4. Zealot by Reza Aslan                                                
5. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg                                           
6. Salinger by David Shields & Shane Salerno                       
7. This Town by Mark Leibovich                                        
8. Lawrence in Arabia by Scott Anderson
9. Duck Commander Family by Willie & Korie Robertson
10. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand                                     
11. Butler by Wil Haygood
12. Exposed by Jane Velez-Mitchell                                      
13. The Guns at Last Light by Rick Atkinson                         
14. The Smartest Kids in the World by Amanda Ripley          
15. The Sports Gene by David Epstein

Washington Post 9/15/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Never Go Back by Lee Child
2. The Mayan Secrets by Clive Cussler & Thomas Perry        
3. The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith                       
4. Inferno by Dan Brown                                                 
5. And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini            
6. Styxx by Sherrilyn Kenyon
7. Maddaddam by Margaret Atwood                          
8. Dark Lycan by Christine Feehan
9. Mistress by James Patterson
10. How the Light Gets In by Louise Penny

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Si-Cology 1 by Si Robertson with Mark Schlabach
2. Liberty Amendments by Mark R. Levin
3. Mission in a Bottle by Seth Goldman
4. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
5. This Town by Mark Leibovich
6. Zealot by Reza Aslan
7. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg
8. Happy, Happy, Happy by Phil Robertson with Mark Schlabach
9. Lawrence in Arabia by Scott Anderson
10. Salinger by David Shields & hane Salerno                     

Thursday, September 12, 2013

My Favorite Historian


Whenever I am desperate for a book to read or listen to while waiting for my reserved items to become available, I look for something by Joseph Ellis. Professor Ellis is an expert in the era of the American Revolution and has written extensively on this period and the people who made things happen (relying on a surprisingly large amount of luck) at this tumultuous time.


Declaration of Independence, by John Trumbull,
 commissioned in 1817


In his recent book, Revolutionary Summer: the Birth of American Independence, Professor Ellis gives readers a detailed narrative of just one small part of the struggle that would last for years, the months from May to October 1776. While we usually think of the American Revolution as a whole, Ellis points out that it actually had two components, the military actions that had already been going on for a year and the political side, centered in the Continental Congress. Revolutionary Summer is a fascinating look at how the two components, although usually at odds, intertwined throughout the course of the war and, surprisingly, managed to produce a new nation.

Some ideas discussed in Revolutionary Summer still speak to controversies and discussions we have today: the reluctance of the states (and their citizens) to pay the pensions of officers who served in the Continental Army; the ideal of relying on local militias versus the creation of a standing army, which proved unrealistic then and has led to our current heated discussions about the Second Amendment; the desire of the losing side to find someone to blame for military defeat.

Professor Ellis also does a wonderful job in exploring the personalities of the people involved in these world-changing events. First Family: John and Abigail Adams gives readers a glimpse into the lives of John and Abigail Adams in their own words. Fully aware of their place in history, this couple made sure that their correspondence and other documents would survive as testimony to what had been accomplished.

Equally enlightening are these other works by Joseph J. Ellis:






Please check the library’s catalog for availability of these titles in a number of formats and discover why Joseph Ellis is my favorite historian.
You can also learn more about programs, events and the library's collection on our website or by following us on Facebook

Maryellen@Warrenton

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 9/8/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1.  How the Light Gets In by Louise Penny
2. The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith
3. Inferno by Dan Brown
4. Mistress by James Patterson
5. And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
6. The Whole Enchilada by Diane Mott Davidson 
7. Bones of the Lost by Kathy Reichs
8. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
9. Night Film by Marisha Pessl 
10. The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon 
11. The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty 
12. Kenobi by John Jackson Miller 
13. The Kill List by Frederick Forsyth 
14. The Third Kingdom by Terry Goodkind 
15. The English Girl by Daniel Silva                                  

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Liberty Amendments by Mark R. Levin
2. Zealot by Reza Aslan
3. This Town by Mark Leibovich
4. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg
5. Happy, Happy, Happy by Phil Robertson with Mark Schlabach
6. Lawrence in Arabia by Scott Anderson
7. Exposed by Jane Velez-Mitchell
8. Butler by Wil Haygood
9. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
10. Duck Commander Family by Willie & Korie Robertson
11. The Reason I Jump by Naoki Higashida
12. Manson by Jeff Guinn
13. The Sports Gene by David Epstein
14. Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls by David Sedaris
15. The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown

Washington Post 9/8/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. How the Light Gets In by Louise Penny
2. The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith
3. Inferno by Dan Brown
4. And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
5. Mistress by James Patterson
6. Bones of the Lost by Kathy Reichs
7. The Whole Enchilada by Diane Mott Davidson
8. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
9. Night Film by Marisha Pessl
10. The Kill List by Frederick Forsyth

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Liberty Amendments by Mark R. Levin
2. The Gift of Adversity by Norman E. Rosenthal
3. This Town by Mark Leibovich
4. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg
5. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
6. Zealot by Reza Aslan
7. What Got You Here Won’t Get YouThere by Marshall Goldsmith
8. The Smartest Kids in the World by Amanda Ripley
9. Butler by Wil Haygood
10. Jesus Calling by Sarah Young

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Best Seller Lists


New York Times 9/1/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith
2. Inferno by Dan Brown
3. Mistress by James Patterson
4. And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
5. The Third Kingdom by Terry Goodkind
6. Night Film by Marisha Pessl
7. The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon
8. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
9. The Kill List by Frederick Forsyth
10. The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty
11. The English Girl by Daniel Silva
12. The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
13. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin
14. Rose Harbor in Bloom by Debbie Macomber
15. William Shakespeare’s Star Wars by Ian Doescher

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Liberty Amendments by Mark R. Levin
2. Zealot by Reza Aslan
3. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg
4. Happy, Happy, Happy by Phil Robertson with Mark Schlabach
5. Exposed by Jane Velez-Mitchell
6. Lawrence in Arabia by Scott Anderson
7. This Town by Mark Leibovich
8. Infiltrated by Jay W. Richards
9. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
10. Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls by David Sedaris
11. Duck Commander Family by Willie & Korie Robertson
12. Manson by Jeff Guinn
13. Butler by Wil Haygood
14. The Sports Gene by David Epstein
15. A Street Cat Named Bob by James Bowen

Washington Post 9/1/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith
2. Inferno by Dan Brown
3. Mistress by James Patterson
4. And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
5. Night Film by Marisha Pessl
6. The Kill List by Frederick Forsyth
7. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
8. The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon
9. The Third Kingdom by Terry Goodkind
10. The English Girl by Daniel Silva

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Liberty Amendments by Mark R. Levin
2. This Town by Mark Leibovich
3. Zealot by Reza Aslan
4. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
5. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg
6. Lawrence in Arabia by Scott Anderson
7. Jesus Calling by Sarah Young
8. Happy, Happy, Happy by Phil Robertson with Mark Schlabach
9. George Washington by Jack E. Levin
10. RG3: The Promise by Dave Sheinin

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Did You Ever Wonder?

Fascinating Tales of Research in Virginiana Room


The Fauquier County Public Library holds a wonderful treasure trove of history, family lore, and stories in its Virginiana Room. As librarians, we enjoy guiding patrons in finding information of interest to them, such as family histories, property records, or historical facts about Fauquier County.
We had a recent inquiry about what life was like in Fauquier County in 1932, particularly Fauquier residents' usage of telephones. This led to a fun research project, which involved newspapers, books, and online resources to lead to an answer.
In the course of the project, we discovered some interesting facts:
  • The population listed for Fauquier in 1930 was 21,071
  • The 1930 census did not ask whether people had a telephone; however they did ask whether they had a radio set! In 1930, 688 households in Fauquier County had a radio set – here are the statistics by district:
    • District 1 (Cedar Run, North) – 50
    • District 2 (Cedar Run, South) – 21
    • District 3 (Warrenton) – 124
    • District 4 (Center, North, not Warrenton) – 112
    • District 5 (Center, South, not Warrenton) – 120
    • District 6 (Lee, Remington) – 18
    • District 7 (Lee, North, not Remington) – 6
    • District 8 (Lee, Middle, not Remington) – 9
    • District 9 (Lee, South) – 17
    • District 10 (Marshall, Northwest) – 12
    • District 11 (Marshall, Northeast) – 23
    • District 12 (South, Marshall Village) – 57
    • District 13 (The Plains) – 25
    • District 14 (Scott, West) – 28
    • District 15 (Scott, Middle) – 40
    • District 16 (Scott, East, not The Plains) - 26
  • In the 1932 election, Fauquier County voted for Franklin Delano Roosevelt with about 80% of the vote. See a map of the 1932 vote for every county in the United States at http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/43/PresidentialCounty1932Colorbrewer.gif

There were also statistics about the number of telephones in the United States by state for the years 1927 and 1932 (see below), but not specifically for Fauquier County.
  •  There were at least four telephone companies in Fauquier in the past, but none of the resources gave dates or statistics:
    •  Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company – located at 4th and Main Streets, Warrenton
    • Fauquier and Upperville Telephone Company
    • Southern Bell Telephone Company
    • Telephone Exchange of Warrenton
The national telephone statistics for the U.S. and Virginia are as follows :
  
Census of Electrical Industries - 1927
  • U.S. - Number of Telephones – 18,522,767
  • Virginia - Number of Telephones – 183,698


  
Census of Electrical Industries - 1932
This census divided the number of telephones by residential and business
  • U.S. – Number of Residential Telephones - 11,089,946
  • U.S. – Number of Business Telephones – 6,334,460
  • Total U.S. = 17,424,406


  • Virginia - Number of Residential Telephones – 134,338
  • Virginia – Number of Business Telephones – 62,618
  • Total Virginia = 196,956


If you are interested in looking at some interesting books or other materials related to either Fauquier County or the 1930s, try some of these titles:
Warrenton and Fauquier County
250 years in Fauquier County by Fauquier Historical Society
Fauquier County (Postcard History Series) by Matthew C. Benson
Fauquier County, Virginia, 1759-1959 by Fauquier County Bicentennial Committee
1930s
This fabulous century (1920-1930) and (1930-1940) by Time-Life Books
The 1930s (DVD)

To learn more about programs, events and the library's collection, visit our website and follow us on Facebook

Mary Sue @ Warrenton

Sunday, September 1, 2013

Book Discussions for September

The following books are under discussion at the library in the month of September. See the library's website for details on meeting dates and times.



*September 9 - "Hairball" by Margaret Atwood (Warrenton Great Books Group)

*September 11 - Any work by Nora Ephron (Reader's choice) (Marshall Afternoon Book Club)

*September 19 - The Ice Princess by Camilla Lackberg (Warrenton Mystery Book Club)

*September 16 - Modoc: The True Story of the Greatest Elephant That Ever Lived by Ralph Halfer (Bealeton Book Club)

*September 30 - Isaac's Storm: A man, a time and the deadliest hurrican in history by Erick Larson (Marshall Evening Book Club)