Friday, March 29, 2013

Spring in Beautiful Virginia

My son-in-law, Michael Payton on Old Rag Mtn.
So it begins with the coming of each spring; as the days grow longer and the sun shines warmer, the yearning begins for long walks in the woods. Living in Fauquier, we are fortunate to have the Blue Ridge Mountains in our back yard and access to one of the most scenic hiking areas in America. About twenty-five percent of the Appalachian Trail (AT) runs through Virginia spanning about 544 miles, more than any other state. While trekking the AT may be a bit ambitious for many hikers, there are plenty of shorter hikes in the area to enjoy. Exploring the Appalachian Trail: Hikes in the Virginias and The Best of the Appalachian Trail Day Hikes will help you be a part of the AT experience without hiking from Maine to Georgia. Virginia trail guides and maps, published by the Appalachian Trail Conservancy are also available at the library.  And don’t miss Karin Wuertz-Schaefer’s HikingVirginia’s National Forests.  These books are informative resources when deciding which trail is best for you. 

While waiting for warmer days, it’s a good time to prepare, mentally and physically, for summer hikes. To help understand why we possess this desire to walk, you might appreciate The Lost Art of Walking by Geoff Nicholson.  Reading hiking memoirs will help with understanding other hikers you meet on the trail.  A Walk in the Woods chronicles Bill Bryson’s AT experience with hilarity and a tender dose of appreciation for the American wilderness. Paul Stutzman takes a life-changing walk after the loss of his wife to breast cancer in HikingThrough and in A Walk for Sunshine, Jeff Alt tells of his charity walk dedicated to his brother with cerebral palsy. If you’ve spent any time at all rambling through the woods, you will appreciate their stories of wildlife encounters (human and otherwise), weather and spiritual change.
 
To keep you safe on the trail, The Complete Practical Guide to Camping, Hiking and Wilderness Skills features over 800 full-color photographs, including step-by-step techniques for key skills. To help you master your GPS and compass, the library offers The GPS Handbook: A Guide for the Outdoors and the old-fashioned and ever-dependable Boy Scout publication, Orienteering.

Whether your desire is fitness, photography, bird watching or connecting with nature, our reference librarians are here to point you in the right direction (no GPS required) and help you make the most of your hiking experiences.

See you on the trail!
Julia @ Bealeton

Monday, March 25, 2013

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 3/24/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult                                           
2. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
3. Alex Cross, Run by James Patterson                                  
4. A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy                                   
5. Breaking Point by C. J. Box
6. The Striker by Clive Cussler & Justin Scott                          
7. Bloodfire Quest by Terry Brooks
8. Calculated in Death by J. D. Robb                                     
9. Frost Burned by Patricia Briggs
10. Damascus Countdown by Joel C. Rosenberg
11. The Dinner by Herman Koch                                            
12. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson   
13. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin                    
14. The Chance by Karen Kingsbury                                       
15. Tenth of December by George Saunders                            

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg                                             
2. Sum It Up by Pat Summitt with Sally Jenkins                      
3. Until I Say Good-Bye by Susan Spencer-Wendel & Bret Witter
4. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly                                          
5. Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss
6. A Higher Call by Adam Makos with Larry Alexander             
7. My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor                              
8. American Sniper by Chris Kyle                                          
9. The Soundtrack of My Life by Clive Davis & Anthony DeCurtis
10. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer
11. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
12. Detroit by Charlie LeDuff
13. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand                                        
14. Wild by Cheryl Strayed
15. Coolidge by Amity Shlaes

Washington Post

Hardcover Fiction
1. Alex Cross, Run by James Patterson
2. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
3. The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult
4. The Striker by Clive Cussler & Justin Scott
5. A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy
6. Calculated in Death by J. D. Robb                                     
7. Ghana Must Go by Taiye Selas
8. Bloodfire Quest by Terry Brooks
9. Frost Burned by Patricia Briggs                                         
10. The Dinner by Herman Koch                                            

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg                                             
2. My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor                              
3. To Sell is Human by Daniel H. Pink
4. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath                                            
5. Shred: The Revolutionary Diet by Ian K. Smith
6. Jesus Calling by Sarah Young                                           
7. The End of Power by Moises Naim
8. The FastDiet by Michael Mosley
9. The Hormone Cure by Sara Gottfried                                 
10. The Last Line of Defense by Ken Cuccinelli                         

Friday, March 22, 2013

Is This Place For Real?

I was only a few pages into Wicked Autumn by G M Malliet when the word “Brigadoon” popped into my head.  Like the magical village in Lerner and Loewe’s musical of the same name, Malliet’s fictional village of Nether Monkslip seems not quite real. Happily, I found out that I was not the only one to feel this way -- on page 129, one of the characters refers to the place as “our Brigadoon.”

Mystery Book Club members generally begin the discussion of each monthly selection by reviewing setting, characters and plot. For some of us, setting carries great importance because, in most cases, it establishes the whole ambience of the story. In some cases, the setting plays an even more important role: it “becomes a character,” as we might say in our discussion. Think Downton Abbey.

It would seem that one of the first things an author must do when beginning a new book (or series) is tackle The Dilemma of the Fictional Setting. Will the story be set in a real city with the actual streets, buildings and other sites described? Will the reader be able to get out his map and follow, for example, V I Warshawski (Sara Paretsky) on her adventures in Chicago? We walk the streets of LA with Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch or visit Cleveland’s metropolitan area with Les Roberts’ Milan Jacovich.

Many of the books in Deborah Crombie’s Kincaid and James series include beautifully drawn maps of the London neighborhoods that serve as her settings. Authors who create settings that are not real may also provide maps, perhaps not as detailed, as does Malliet in her books set in Nether Monkslip.

Maybe the story will be set in a fictional city or town that is loosely based on a place that readers might recognize. Sue Grafton’s Santa Teresa feels very familiar to readers who have visited southern California, but we probably won’t find Rosie’s restaurant or the offices of California Fidelity in any west coast city. Some of our favorite authors are very good at creating new places that feel just right. Charlaine Harris’ Bon Temps has the right feel as a small Louisiana town, a place that must surely have a bar like Merlotte’s.

Some amazing authors (George R R Martin comes to mind) create entire continents dotted with diverse cities, towns and wild places, and people them with fascinating and complex cultures. One of my favorite authors, J K Rowling, moves readers effortlessly from muggle London and its suburbs to magical Hogwarts, just a leisurely train ride away.

Of course, some authors craft their stories in such a way that setting doesn’t matter, the action could take place anywhere. But for my part, I would always prefer the book that takes me to a lovely place that is familiar and comforting,  a wonderful place that is new to me, or an exciting place that makes me stop reading to wonder “Wow, is this place for real?”

 
Maryellen@Warrenton

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Best Seller Lists


New York Times 3/17/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Frost Burned by Patricia Briggs
2. The Striker by Clive Cussler & Justin Scott
3. The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult
4. Alex Cross, Run by James Patterson                                 
5. A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy
6. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                                
7. Damascus Countdown by Joel C. Rosenberg
8. The Chance by Karen Kingsbury
9. Calculated in Death by J. D. Robb                                    
10. The Last Threshold by R. A. Salvatore
11. Shadow of Freedom by David Weber
12. The Dinner by Herman Koch
13. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson  
14. Night Moves by Randy Wayne White
15. Tenth of December by George Saunders                            

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Sum It Up by Pat Summitt with Sally Jenkins
2. Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss                                        
3. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly                                         
4. My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor                             
5. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
6. The Soundtrack of My Life by Clive Davis & Anthony DeCurtis
7. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer                  
8. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly                                            
9. Coolidge by Amity Shlaes
10. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand                                       
11. Out of Order by Sandra Day O’Connor (NOTE: Library has e-book) 
12. Damn Few by Rorke Denver & Ellis Henican                       
13. Francona by Terry Francona & Dan Shaughnessy               
14. Wild by Cheryl Strayed                                                   
15. A Higher Call by Adam Makos with Larry Alexander             

Washington Post 3/17/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Alex Cross, Run by James Patterson                                 
2. The Striker by Clive Cussler & Justin Scott                         
3. The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult
4. Frost Burned by Patricia Briggs                                        
5. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
6. A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy
7. Calculated in Death by J. D. Robb
8. Shadow of Freedom by David Weber
9. Damascus Countdown by Joel C. Rosenberg
10. How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia by Mohsin Hamid

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Shred: The Revolutionary Diet by Ian K. Smith                  
2. My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor
3. Big Data by Viktor Mayer-Schonberger & Kenneth Cukier
4. Out of Order by Sandra Day O’Connor (NOTE: Library has e-book)                                      
5. Jesus Calling by Sarah Young                                          
6. Bull by the Horns by Sheila Bair                                       
7. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
8. Vital Voices by Alyse Nelson
9. The Blood Sugar Solution Cookbook by Mark Hyman          
10. Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 3/10/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Calculated in Death by J. D. Robb                                     
2. The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult                                           
3. Alex Cross, Run by James Patterson
4. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                                 
5. A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy
6. Red Velvet Cupcake Murder by Joanne Fluke
7. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson
8. The Dinner by Herman Koch                                            
9. Guilt by Jonathan Kellerman
10. Tenth of December by George Saunders
11. A Deeper Love Inside by Sister Souljah                              
12. Touch and Go by Lisa Gardner
13. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin                    
14. Bad Blood by Dana Stabenow                                           
15. Vampires in the Lemon Grove by Karen Russell                    

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss
2. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer
3. America the Beautiful by Ben and Candy Carson                 
4. American Sniper by Chris Kyle                                          
5. My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor
6. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly                                          
7. The Soundtrack of My Life by Clive Davis & Anthony DeCurtis
8. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly                                             
9. Coolidge by Amity Shlaes
10. Francona by Terry Francona & Dan Shaughnessy                
11. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
12. Damn Few by Rorke Denver & Ellis Henican                        
13. Whitey Burgler by Kevin Cullen & Shelley Murphy
14. Going Clear by Lawrence Wright                                       
15. Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo

Please Note: The Washington Post was not published this week.


 

Friday, March 8, 2013

Gettin' Crafty



While thoughts of winter’s end and the first buds of spring are called to mind when you think of March, it is usually still too cold to go out and do those fun spring-time activities.  However with spring fever firmly set in, what can you do with those little ones (and perhaps not so little ones) who are getting bored and antsy?  You’re in luck!  March also happens to be National Craft Month, which is a perfect excuse to break out the glue, glitter and some creativity.  Established in 1994 by the Craft and Hobby Association to help people learn about and re-discover the joy of crafting, it has grown into an international celebration of creativity and innovation with millions of craft enthusiasts ‘getting their craft on’ during the month.
 
Running low on crafty ideas?  Don’t worry, we have you covered!  Looking for something to do with the kids?  We have a variety of craft books ranging from everyday crafts, cultural themed crafts, and even activity guides with craft ideas that teach about the ancient Egyptians (and their neighbors), ancient Greeks and even early American pioneers.


Perhaps you’re looking to learn a new craft or skill yourself?  We have seemly endless volumes of books on various handicrafts, from making decorations and keepsakes for your wedding, gifts for someone expecting a baby, jewelry making and various craft encyclopedias filled with ideas for every season and theme imaginable.  You know, the definition of craft not only pertains to “arts and crafts” but also trade skills.  Perhaps you would enjoy expanding your skill set to include carpentry, landscaping, metal working, or even candlemaking. 


We have everything you need to refresh your skills, learn new ones, or just share some favorite ones with a child or loved one.  So swing on by your local branch, we’ll be glad to help you ‘get your craft on’.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Best Seller Lists




New York Times 3/3/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Alex Cross, Run by James Patterson                                  
2. A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy                                   
3. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                                 
4. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson
5. Guilt by Jonathan Kellerman
6. Tenth of December by George Saunders                            
7. The Dinner by Herman Koch                                            
8. Private Berlin by James Patterson & Mark Sullivan
9. The Sound of Broken Glass by Deborah Crombie
10. Touch and Go by Lisa Gardner                                          
11. Until the End of Time by Danielle Steel                                       
12. Vampires in the Lemon Grove by Karen Russell
13. Suspect by Robert Crais                                                  
14. The Racketeer by John Grisham
15. A Deeper Love Inside by Sister Souljah                              

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
2. The Soundtrack of My Life by Clive Davis & Anthony DeCurtis
3. My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor                              
4. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly
5. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly                                             
6. Coolidge by Amity Shlaes
7. Francona by Terry Francona & Dan Shaughnessy                
8. America the Beautiful by Ben and Candy Carson
9. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer
10. Damn Few by Rorke Denver & Ellis Henican
11. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
12. Going Clear by Lawrence Wright
13. Long Shot by Mike Piazza
14. Drinking and Tweeting by Brandi Glanville & Leslie Bruce
15. Why Priests? by Garry Wills

Washington Post 3/3/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Alex Cross, Run by James Patterson                                  
2. A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy
3. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
4. Tenth of December by George Saunders                            
5. Private Berlin by James Patterson & Mark Sullivan                       
6. Until the End of Time by Danielle Steel                                       
7. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson
8. The Sound of Broken Glass by Deborah Crombie
9. Guilt by Jonathan Kellerman                                             
10. A Deeper Love Inside by Sister Souljah                              

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Shred: The Revolutionary Diet by Ian K. Smith
2. My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor                              
3. Coolidge by Amity Shlaes
4. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath                                            
5. Jesus Calling by Sarah Young                                           
6. The Melt Method by Sue Hitzmann
7. The Legend of Zelda by Shigeru Miyamoto
8. American Sniper by Chris Kyle                                          
9. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly                                             
10. Life Code by Phil McGraw

Friday, March 1, 2013

March Book Discussions


The following books are under discussion at the library in the month of March.  Please see the library's website for details on meeting dates and times.

 
·     Mar. 4 – Antigony by Sophocles (Warrenton Great Books Group)
 
 
 
 
  • Mar.25 – Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe (Marshall Evening Book Club)