Monday, January 28, 2013

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 1/27/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson   
2. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
3. The Fifth Assassin by Brad Meltzer                                     
4. Tenth of December by George Saunders                            
5. The Third Bullet by Stephen Hunter
6. Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker by Jennifer Chiaverini                 
7. The Racketeer by John Grisham
8. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis                              
9. Standing in Another Man’s Grave by Ian Rankin
10. Kinsey and Me by Sue Grafton                                          
11. The Forgotten by David Baldacci                                               
12. Cross Roads by William Paul Young                                    
13. Collateral Damage by Stuart Woods                                  
14. The Round House by Louise Erdrich
15. The Husband List by Janet Evanovich

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor
2. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly                                          
3. Going Clear by Lawrence Wright                                       
4. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer                   
5. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly                                             
6. A Higher Call by Adam Makos with Larry Alexander             
7. The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond
8. Thomas Jefferson by Jon Meacham                                   
9. To Sell is Human by Daniel H. Pink
10. Total Frat Move by W. R Bolen                                         
11. My Share of the Task by Stanley McChrystal
12. Ten Years Later by Hoda Kotb with Jane Lorenzini
13. The Dude and the Zen Master by Jeff Bridges                     
14. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand                                        
15. Wild by Cheryl Strayed                                                     

Washington Post 1/27/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. The Fifth Assassin by Brad Meltzer
2. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson
3. Tenth of December by George Saunders         
4. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                                 
5. The Third Bullet by Stephen Hunter
6. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis                              
7. Threat Vector by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney                
8. The Forgotten by David Baldacci
9. 1356 by Bernard Cornwell
10. Standing in Another Man’s Grave by Ian Rankin

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor                              
2. Shred: The Revolutionary Diet by Ian K. Smith                   
3. To Sell is Human by Daniel H. Pink                                    
4. Fat Chance by Robert Lustig                                             
5. My Share of the Task by Stanley McChrystal
6. Thomas Jefferson by Jon Meacham                                   
7. Jesus Calling by Sarah Young                                           
8. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer                   
9. Eat More of What You Love by Marlene Koch
10. I Declare by Joel Osteen                                                  

Friday, January 25, 2013

The Snow Child


In the fall of each year, the two Marshall Book Clubs set about choosing a list of books for the following year.  The selection process is a joint endeavor that fosters interesting discussions and a vote for those few books that will be the inspiration for our  “year of reading”.  The Evening Book Club chose the perfect winter book for its January selection.  While we were experiencing a relatively warm Virginia winter, The Snow Child, by first time author, Eowyn Ivey, has transported all of us to the ice, cold and rugged landscape of Alaska.

 
The story introduces us to an aging, childless couple who leave their Pennsylvania farm in an effort to find some greater meaning in the final years of their lives.  They have known their share of sorrows, the greatest of those, the loss of their only child, at birth.  That tiny stillborn child has grieved them through the years.  Their most, unlikely, destination in this quest to begin anew is the wilderness of 1920’s Alaska, where they set out to become homesteaders.  Ill prepared for the harsh realities of their new life, Mabel and Jack begin to drift even further apart.  The farm work proves to be beyond Jack’s strength and knowledge, and Mabel sinks further into loneliness and despair, each day.  There are moments, however, when the beauty and wonder of their new world has the power to captivate them, as on one dark, snowy evening.  In a joyful moment, they build a child out of snow.  In the morning, they awake to find that the snow child is gone, but they spot a young blonde-haired girl running into the woods.  The little girl, who calls herself, Faina, slips in and out of Mabel and Jack’s life.  While delicate and ethereal, Faina seems to be a child of the ice and snow, who is able to survive, alone, in the Alaskan wilderness.  The lonely couple grow to love her, as their own child, but can she really be their own?   Is she even real, or is she a part of a long remembered fairy tale from Mabel’s youth.  Even as the story draws to a poignant close, all questions are not answered with complete certainty.

Most of our readers speak of the book as one with fairy tale qualities, yet, also, a story that vividly describes the beauty and harsh dangers of a world so few of us know.

 
The Alaskan author, Eowyn Ivey, describes the story as inspired by her discovery of a fairy tale in the book store where she works.  The original story is a Russian fairy tale called “Snegurochka” or “The Snow Maiden”.  Ms. Ivey describes how she was “captivated by the landscape and the role that it played in the telling of the tale.  Black spruce and dark winters spoke of lonely isolation, and the fresh, sparkling snow brought hope and magic.”  She goes on to explain why the story so resonated with her.

“Growing up in Alaska, I’ve at times felt a foreigner in the pages of my country’s literature.  All the books I had read and loved, but not one of them told of my home.  The characters didn’t live the way we did. They didn’t cut their own firewood or hunt their own meals.  The setting was never my backyard, where wild forest gives way to rugged mountains and frozen rivers.  But the setting of the old Russian fairy tale was hauntingly familiar.”

 On the evening of January 28th, the Marshall Evening Book Club will have the privilege of speaking with Eowyn Ivey from her home in Palmer, Alaska.  She will be calling in to our meeting, and all members are looking forward to hearing more about a book that has cast its magic upon all of us.

 
The Marshall Library has two very active book clubs that provide good reads, lively discussions, field trips and friendships.  The Afternoon Book Club meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the month at 1:00.  The Evening Book Club meets the last Monday of the month at 7:00. 
 
 
New members are always welcome!


Debbie C. @ Marshall Branch
 

 

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 1/20/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson   
2. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                                 
3. Tenth of December by George Saunders
4. Kinsey and Me by Sue Grafton
5. Collateral Damage by Stuart Woods                                  
6. The Husband List by Janet Evanovich                                 
7. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis                              
8. The Blood Gospel by James Rollins & Rebecca Cantrell         
9. The Racketeer by John Grisham
10. Dream Eyes by Jayne Ann Krentz
11. 1356 by Bernard Cornwell                                                
12. The Forgotten by David Baldacci
13. Cross Roads by William Paul Young                                    
14. Threat Vector by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney
15. Empire and Honor by W. E. B. Griffin & William Butterworth  

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly
2. My Share of the Task by Stanley McChrystal
3. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer                   
4. Thomas Jefferson by Jon Meacham
5. The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond
6. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly                                             
7. The Dude and the Zen Master by Jeff Bridges                     
8. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand                                        
9. Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo
10. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg                               
11. A Higher Call by Adam Makos with Larry Alexander
12. Wild by Cheryl Strayed                                                    
13. The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver                             
14. America Again by Stephen Colbert, et al.
15. How Children Succeed by Paul Tough                                

Washington Post 1/20/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson   
2. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                                 
3. The Intercept by Dick Wolf                                                      
4. Tenth of December by George Saunders                            
5. 1356 by Bernard Cornwell
6. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis                              
7. The Husband List by Janet Evanovich                                 
8. The Forgotten by David Baldacci                                               
9. Kinsey and Me by Sue Grafton                                          
10. Dream Eyes by Jayne Ann Krentz

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. My Share of the Task by Stanley McChrystal                              
2. Shred: The Revolutionary Diet by Ian K. Smith                   
3. Ninja Innovation by Gary Shapiro
4. The Plan by Lyn-Genet Recitas
5. Thomas Jefferson by Jon Meacham                                   
6. Fat Chance by Robert Lustig                                             
7. Barefoot Contessa Foolproof by Ina Garten                         
8. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath                                            
9. To Sell is Human by Daniel H. Pink                                    
10. The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond

This Month's Consumer Reports: Smart Phones, Tablets,


Did you get a new smart phone recently?  You might want to check out the January 2013 issue of Consumer Reports.  It compares the three operating systems for smart phones (Android OS, Apple iOS, and Windows Phone), and rates the types of phones (Motorola, Samsung, Apple, LG, etc.) offered by different carriers (Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile, and AT&T).  There are also ratings for cell phone service offered by the major carriers, ratings for cell service by city, including Washington DC, and ratings for cell phone stores, both online and walk-in.

If you 're looking to buy a new tablet, read the information on three new tablets:  the Nook HD, the iPad Mini, and Microsoft's Surface tablet.

If you need a break from all this smart phone info, the January issue also rates grape jelly and strawberry jam, as well as single-serve coffeemakers!

~ Vicky @ Warrenton Adult Reference

Monday, January 14, 2013

Best Seller Lists


New York Times 1/13/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                                
2. Empire and Honor by W. E. B. Griffin & William Butterworth
3. The Racketeer by John Grisham                                       
4. The Forgotten by David Baldacci
5. Threat Vector by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney               
6. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis                             
7. Cross Roads by William Paul Young                                   
8. Shadow Woman by Linda Howard                                    
9. Notorious Nineteen by Janet Evanovich                             
10. The Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling                                
11. The Black Box by Michael Connelly                                   
12. Merry Christmas, Alex Cross by James Patterson
13. The Round House by Louise Erdrich                                  
14. Two Graves by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child                  
15. The Last Man by Vince Flynn                                             

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly
2. Thomas Jefferson by Jon Meacham
3. The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond
4. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer                  
5. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
6. Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo
7. America Again by Stephen Colbert, et al.                          
8. The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver                            
9. Wild by Cheryl Strayed
10. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand                                       
11. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg
12. A Higher Call by Adam Makos with Larry Alexander            
13. Quiet by Susan Cain                                                       
14. Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die by Willie Nelson
15. How Children Succeed by Paul Tough                                 

Washington Post 1/13/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
2. Empire and Honor by W. E. B. Griffin & William Butterworth 
3. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis                             
4. Threat Vector by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney               
5. The Forgotten by David Baldacci                                              
6. Shadow Woman by Linda Howard
7. The Racketeer by John Grisham
8. Merry Christmas, Alex Cross by James Patterson                
9. Notorious Nineteen by Janet Evanovich
10. The Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling                                

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. To Sell is Human by Daniel H. Pink
2. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
3. Thomas Jefferson by Jon Meacham
4. Shred: The Revolutionary Diet by Ian K. Smith
5. Barefoot Contessa Foolproof by Ina Garten
6. The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond                     
7. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly
8. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer                  
9. I Declare by Joel Osteen                                                 
10. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly

Friday, January 11, 2013

A New Year, A New Beginning (1.11.2013)

There’s something about a new year that’s so hopeful; a brand-new calendar or planner with clean, fresh pages seems to offer a world of possibilities. In January, the holidays are behind us and new ventures await.

Whatever your new beginning, let the library be your partner. Find just the right books, articles, and DVDs at the library. Your librarian can help you find and borrow similar materials from other libraries, and help you find people and groups who share or support your interests.

Here’s a very small indication of what you’ll find in the library.

Do you want to lose weight or get in great shape? How about checking out Skinny Chicks Eat Real Food: Kick Your Fake Food Habit, Kickstart your Weight Loss  by Christine Avanti? Or maybe you’d like to read an ebook: A Beach Body in Six Weeks: The How-To Guide .

In 2013 do you plan to learn a new skill? Maybe you’re taking a trip to another country and would like to be able to speak a little of another language; you’d turn to something like Transparent Italian  a USB flash drive. Maybe this year you’ll build a gazebo, a wall, a bookcase. Backyard Cottages and Gazebos , Ultimate Guide: Walks, Patios, and Walls  or How to Make Bookshelves and Bookcases  could be just what you need to get started.

If you’ve decided you really need to get organized this year, Andrew Mellen offers up ideas in Unstuff Your Life!: Kick the Clutter Habit and Completely Organize Your Life for Good .

Are you familiar with having your good intentions fizzle out a few weeks after you start a new project? I am. In fact, if you make it a few weeks before you fizzle out, bravo! Maybe you and I should include rewards and motivators in our plans for 2013. Whether it’s reading a guide for success, such as Positive Intelligence: Why Only 20% of Teams and Individuals Achieve Their True Potential and How You Can Achieve Yours or encouraging affirmations, as in the electronic book 365 Words of Well-Being for Women , we can find words that will help keep us on track.

I enjoy reading fiction that’s relevant to what’s going on in my life. If I’m tackling weight loss, I’ll enjoy a story dealing with that, such as Cooking for Harry: A Low-Carbohydrate Novel  by Kay-Marie James. It’s a fast-paced book about marriage and relationships. An interest in carpentry might lead me to read Smitten , a short novel by Janet Evanovich, better known for her Stephanie Plum series.

Here’s a quote from Edith Lovejoy Pierce, a poet. She said, “We will open the book. Its pages are blank. We are going to put words on them ourselves. The book is called Opportunity and its first chapter is New Year's Day.” And so we begin 2013 together.

Amy, volunteer @ Warrenton

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Best Seller Lists


New York Times 1/13/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                                 
2. Empire and Honor by W. E. B. Griffin & William Butterworth
3. The Racketeer by John Grisham                                        
4. The Forgotten by David Baldacci
5. Threat Vector by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney                
6. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis                              
7. Cross Roads by William Paul Young                                    
8. Shadow Woman by Linda Howard                                     
9. Notorious Nineteen by Janet Evanovich                              
10. The Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling                                 
11. The Black Box by Michael Connelly                                    
12. Merry Christmas, Alex Cross by James Patterson
13. The Round House by Louise Erdrich                                   
14. Two Graves by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child                   
15. The Last Man by Vince Flynn                                             

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly
2. Thomas Jefferson by Jon Meacham
3. The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond
4. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer                   
5. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
6. Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo
7. America Again by Stephen Colbert, et al.                           
8. The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver                             
9. Wild by Cheryl Strayed
10. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand                                        
11. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg
12. A Higher Call by Adam Makos with Larry Alexander             
13. Quiet by Susan Cain                                                        
14. Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die by Willie Nelson
15. How Children Succeed by Paul Tough                                 

Washington Post 1/13/2013

Hardcover Fiction
1. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn                                                 
2. Empire and Honor by W. E. B. Griffin & William Butterworth  
3. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis                              
4. Threat Vector by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney                
5. The Forgotten by David Baldacci                                               
6. Shadow Woman by Linda Howard
7. The Racketeer by John Grisham
8. Merry Christmas, Alex Cross by James Patterson                 
9. Notorious Nineteen by Janet Evanovich
10. The Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling                                 

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. To Sell is Human by Daniel H. Pink
2. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
3. Thomas Jefferson by Jon Meacham
4. Shred: The Revolutionary Diet by Ian K. Smith
5. Barefoot Contessa Foolproof by Ina Garten
6. The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond                      
7. Killing Kennedy by Bill O’Reilly
8. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer                   
9. I Declare by Joel Osteen                                                  
10. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly

Friday, January 4, 2013

Downton Abbey

Well, the new season of Downton Abbey is almost here.  If you haven't jumped on the bandwagon of reading books---fiction and nonfiction---set in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Britain, well you certainly should.  There's a wealth of good reading!  (And lots of great movies too).

I started off by reading the real story of Highclere Castle, the estate where Downton Abbey is filmed--a fascinating story about the marriage of Lady Almina, Countess of Carnarvon and her husband, Earl Carnarvon.  Well traveled and well heeled, they provided solace to wounded officers during WWI and helped  fund the expeditions that discovered King Tut's tomb.  Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey : The Lost Legacy of Highclere Castle written by the current Countess of Carnarvon was a fascinating read. 

If you haven't read Edith Wharton, give her a try.  The library has her books in print and audio versions, as well as movie adaptations.  Both the Age of Innocence and The Buccaneers are great reads and are set in the Victorian era, full of gossip and relationship trials and tribulations.  The Buccanners, like Lady Grantham of Downton, are noveau riche Americans who go abroad to find husbands among the cash poor Brits.

An author I discovered just a couple of years ago, Kate Morton, may also quench your thirst for Downton  like reads.  Ms. Morton seems to have perfected the ability to write stories with twists and turns and yet keep the story plausible.  The Forgotten Garden was the first of her books that I read.  A real page turner, this book keeps you guessing as you follow the story of three women in different time periods and learn of their connection at the end of the tale.   Her other books The House at Riverton and The Distant Hours I can both highly recommend.  Her newest The Secret Keeper is still on my list of "to reads" but I expect it to be every bit as enthralling as her other works. 


I must admit that I've not read The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro but I've seen the movie starring Anthony Hopkins and it is wonderful.  The plot revolves around the butler, Stevens, who sacrifices his personal life to rise to the top of his profession. 

There are a multitude of other titles, just a few listed below, that just might satisfy your need for all things Downton.  Check them out at the library while you await the much anticipated arrival of season three.

Fall of Giants by Ken Follett - The first book in Follett’s Century Trilogy follows five families as they navigate the tumultous years of World War I, the Russian Revolution, and woman’s suffrage.


The American Heiress by Daisy Goodwin – Like Cora, the Countess of Grantham, The American Heiress’ heroine is a wealthy American that marries a Duke in need of money. Of course, she soon discovers being a Duchess might not be all she wanted or needed.


The Forsyte Sage by John Galsworthy --As the nineteenth century draws to a close the upper middle classes, with their property and propriety, are a diminishing section of society. The Forsytes are deliberately blind to this fact, surrounding themselves with a self-righteous conventionality and a determination to maintain the status quo.

The World of Downton Abbey by Jessica Fellowes--A companion book to the popular British series about the aristocratic Crawley family and their servants offers insights into the story and characters and background information on British society in the early years of the twentieth century.

Happy reading while you wait.

Dawn S. @ Warrenton



















Tuesday, January 1, 2013

The following books are under discussion at the library in the month of January.  See the library's website for details on meeting dates and times.