Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Book Club Discussions for June

The following books are under discussion at the library in the month of June. See the library's website for details on meeting dates and times.













• June 4: Alienated Labour by Karl Marx (Warrenton Library, Great Books Club)

• June 11: Little Princes: One Man's Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal by Conor Grennan
 (Bealeton Library Book Club)

• June 14: Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand (Marshall Library, Afternoon Book Club)

• June 21: Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter by Tom Franklin (Warrenton Library, Mystery Book Club)

• June 25: Room by Emma Donoghue (Marshall Library, Evening Book Club)

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Best Seller Lists


New York Times 5/27/2012

Hardcover Fiction
1. Stolen Prey by John Sandford
2. 11th Hour by James Patterson & Maxine Paetro
3. Deadlocked by Charlaine Harris
4. The Columbus Affair by Steve Berry NOTE: Library has CD book
5. Calico Joe by John Grisham
6. The Innocent by David Baldacci
7. In One Person by John Irving
8. Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel
9. The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King
10. Home by Toni Morrison
11. The Witness by Nora Roberts
12. The Road to Grace by Richard Paul Evans
13. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin
14. The Sins of the Father by Jeffrey Archer
15. The Family Corleone by Ed Falco

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Amateur by Edward Klein
2. The Passage of Power by Robert A. Caro
3. The Art of Intelligence by Henry A. Crumpton
4. My Cross to Bear by Gregg Allman
5. Most Talkative by Andy Cohen
6. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
7. Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake by Anna Quindlen
8. Service by Marcus Luttrell
9. Imagine by Jonah Lehrer
10. The Presidents Club by Nancy Gibbs & Michael Duffy
11. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
12. Prague Winter by Madeleine Albright
13. Screwed! by Dick Morris & Eileen McGann
14. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg
15. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Washington Post 5/27/2012
 
Hardcover Fiction
1. Stolen Prey by John Sandford
2. 11th Hour by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
3. Home by Toni Morrison
4. The Innocent by David Baldacci
5. Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel
6. Deadlocked by Charlaine Harris
7. In One Person by John Irving
8. The Columbus Affair by Steve Berry NOTE: Library has CD book
9. Calico Joe by John Grisham
10. The Stonecutter by Camilla Läckberg

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Art of Intelligence by Henry A. Crumpton
2. The Charge by Brendon Burchard
3. The Passage of Power by Robert A. Caro
4. The Amateur by Edward Klein
5. The Circle Maker Praying Circles … by Mark Batterson
6. The Skinny Rules by Bob Harper
7. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
8. The Presidents Club by Nancy Gibbs & Michael Duffy
9. Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power by Steve Coll
10. Betty and Friends by Betty White

Monday, May 28, 2012

Decoration Day

On Monday, we celebrate what used to be known as “Decoration Day” when I was a kid. The whole neighborhood turned out at the town cemetery armed with lawn mowers, clippers, and geraniums or marigolds to tidy up family graves. It was a great time to visit with family and friends (living and dead) while kids ran around (taking care not to step on any graves).

Sometime later Decoration Day turned into Memorial Day, a day set aside to honor men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Some folks still mark the day by visiting cemeteries or memorials. If you like cemeteries, the library has some resources that might make your visit more interesting.

This Memorial Day spend some time in the Warrenton Cemetery visiting the Memorial Wall. The book, The Memorial Wall To Name the Fallen: Warrenton, Virginia Cemetery, lists the Confederate soldiers buried in the Warrenton Cemetery. Most of them died during or after the battles of First and Second Manassas (1861 and 1862).

If you’re researching family history, Fauquier County [Virginia] Tombstone Inscriptions Volumes 1 and 2, by Nancy Chappelear Baird and Carol Baird might be just what you need to solve a thorny genealogy problem. These two volumes include a list of cemeteries and burials in Fauquier County. They also include lists of Revolutionary War soldiers and Civil War soldiers buried in the county cemeteries.

If inscriptions are your cup of tea, Those Who Were: Annotated Inscriptions of Two Thousand People in Warrenton, Virginia Cemetery, 1811-1998, by Lee Moffett may be just the ticket. Some deaths are listed chronologically while others are listed by profession: Horse People, Town Merchants, Educators, Construction, etc. There is also a section for people who died in the service of their country.

Sometimes gravestones are the real attraction. In his book, Stories in Stone: A Field Guide to Cemetery Symbolism and Iconography, Douglas Keister writes about the secrets of cemetery symbolism. For instance, did you know that it is quite rare to see a sunflower on a tombstone? Did you know that the human foot symbolizes humility and service since it consistently touches the earth?

But if you remember marking “Decoration Day” as I do, then don’t pass up “A Visit with the Folks”, by Pulitzer Prize winning author Russell Baker. Baker writes about going to the “churchyard cemetery on the side of an Appalachian hill in northern Virginia to call on family elders. It slows the juices down something marvelous.” This and other superb pieces drawn from his New York Times “Observer” column are collected in the book The Rescue of Miss Yaskell and Other Pipe Dreams.

Maria @ Warrenton

Saturday, May 26, 2012

Life Changing Ideas


The cover story of the March 12, 2012, issue of Time magazine was a  fascinating list of “10 Ideas That Are Changing Your Life.” Each one of these big ideas is worth further study. Here are just two that I have been thinking about for a while.

“Your Head is in the Cloud”

This means that, faced with the reality of more information than our brains can handle, “we’re increasingly handing off the job of remembering to search engines and smart phones” (p.64). As the article explains, this has both an upside and a downside.

In the chilling short story, The Machine Stops, written in 1909 by E.M. Forster, the author depicts a world in which people are totally reliant on the "Machin". His descriptions include things that eerily seem to predict iPad and Skype —“…the round plate that she held in her hands began to glow…and presently she could see the image of her son, who lived on the other side of the earth, and he could see her.” As the title of the story suggests, things don’t go so well.

After reading Forster’s ideas about the pros and cons of living with our heads in the Cloud, you might be interested in what modern writers have to say. Many science fiction writers have tackled these ideas in their novels but if you’d rather read non-fiction, here are some titles to choose from:

Against the Machine: Being Human in the Age of the Electronic Mob by Lee Siegel

Googled: The End of the World as We Know It by Ken Auletta

The Googlization of Everything (and Why We Should Worry) by Siva Vaidhyanathan

and by David Weinberger

Everything is Miscellaneous: the Power of the New Digital Disorder and

Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren’t the Facts, Experts are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room


“The Rise of the Nones”

The "Nones" are people who respond to questions about affiliation with organized religion as “none.” They are not necessarily atheist or agnostic, but have turned away from organized religion to seek other fulfilling, and sometimes unorthodox ways, to build spiritual lives.

From the deism expressed by Thomas Jefferson and Joseph Priestley to modern secular humanism, the quest for a life of the spirit outside of organized religion is a fascinating study.

The Invention of Air: A Story of Science, Faith, Revolution and the Birth of America by Steven Johnson

Good Without God: What a Billion Nonreligious People Do Believe by Greg M. Epstein

Freethinkers: A History of American Secularism by Susan Jacoby

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values by Sam Harris



Happy reading.

Maryellen@Warrenton

Friday, May 18, 2012

Grocery Store Ratings

How many of you like to grocery shop?  Even if you don't, you might want to check out the grocery store ratings in the May issue of Consumer Reports.  Out of the 52 chain stores rated, Wegmans scored the highest, with high scores in cleanliness and service.  Other area stores in the top 10 are Trader Joe's (2), Costco (5), and Harris Teeter (6).

Planning to have a nice, neat lawn for the summer?  Check out the ratings for lawn mowers, lawn tractors, and string trimmers.  This issue also includes tips on how to have a nice lawn without too much work.

Other informatice articles in May's Consumer Reports include medical devices/implants, student debt, and comparisons between several different small sedan and subcompact cars.  Also, check out the ratings for the best bagels (Dunkin'Donuts came in first), the best toilet paper, and the most reliable tire gauges.

Each brach of the Fauquier County Public Library has the print issues of Consumer Reports from 2009 up to the current issue.  The Find It Virginia databases have an index to the issues from February 1, 1976 to the current issue, and the full-text of the reviews from January 1, 1999 to June 1, 2009.  You can access Find It Virginia from any library computer, or from home with your valid Fauquier County Public Library card.

Monday, May 14, 2012

Best Seller Lists


New York Times 5/13/2012

Hardcover Fiction
1. Deadlocked by Charlaine Harris
2. The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King
3. The Innocent by David Baldacci
4. Calico Joe by John Grisham
5. The Witness by Nora Roberts
6. Robert B. Parker’s Lullaby by Ace Atkins
7. Guilty Wives by James Patterson
8. The Lost Years by Mary Higgins Clark
9. Unnatural Acts by Stuart Woods
10. The Shoemaker’s Wife by Adriana Trigiani
11. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin
12. Sacré Bleu by Christopher Moore
13. The Reverend’s Wife by Kimberla Lawson Roby
14. Born of Silence by Sherrilyn Kenyon
15. Skinnydipping by Bethenny Frankel

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Passage of Power by Robert A. Caro
2. My Cross to Bear by Gregg Allman
3. Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake by Anna Quindlen
4. Prague Winter by Madeleine Albright
5. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg 
6. Drift by Rachel Maddow
7. Imagine by Jonah Lehrer
8. The Presidents Club by Nancy Gibbs & Michael Duffy
9. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
10. Manhunt: The 10-Year Search for Bin Laden by Peter Bergen
11. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
12. Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson
13. Mrs. Kennedy and Me by Clint Hill
14. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
15. End This Depression Now! by Paul Krugman

Washington Post 5/13/2012
 
Hardcover Fiction
1. Deadlocked by Charlaine Harris
2. The Innocent by David Baldacci
3. The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King
4. Calico Joe by John Grisham
5. The Witness by Nora Roberts
6. The Newlyweds by Nell Freudenberger
7. Robert B. Parker’s Lullaby by Ace Atkins
8. The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection by Alexander McCall Smith
9. Guilty Wives by James Patterson
10. The Reverend’s Wife by Kimberla Lawson Roby

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Passage of Power by Robert A. Caro
2. Prague Winter by Madeleine Albright
3. Hard Measures by Jose A. Rodriguez, Jr.
4. The Circle Maker Praying Circles … by Mark Batterson
5. End This Depression Now! by Paul Krugman
6. Manhunt: The 10-Year Search for Bin Laden by Peter Bergen
7. Rather Outspoken by Dan Rather
8. Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power by Steve Coll
9. The Presidents Club by Nancy Gibbs & Michael Duffy
10. The Tyranny of Clichés by Jonah Goldberg

Sitting on the Glass--or Maybe Not.

It has always been a dream of mine to sit on the glass at a professional hockey game. Now if you don’t know much about hockey, sitting on the glass is like the 50 yard line, ringside or courtside seat of ice hockey.

You're right on the front row so you can see all the action and scream and shout and bang on the glass when a great play happens in front of you. Well I guess nothing really keeps me from that dream other than a few hundred dollars, so instead I kick up my feet  in front of my 42 inch HDTV with a few books on hockey and pretend I am there. The season is winding down - regular season is over - the playoffs are underway and the final series to earn the right to take home the Stanley Cup is coming quickly.

So if you are not a hockey fan and want to know what all the excitement is about or if you have been watching the games and want to know what icing or high sticking is and why a goal got “washed out”, the library has a few resources that might help.

Kids’ Hockey: The Parents’ Guide will give you all the basic rules. For some wonderful pictures and history take a look at Total Hockey: The Official Encyclopedia of the NHL or any of our other titles on the history of hockey.

If you don’t want to watch all those commercials, throw in a DVD between periods, Alex Kovalev: My Hockey Tips and Training Methods is one you might find helpful if you're learning the game or feeling like you need a little practice on your shot techniques.
There have been some great players in hockey and it doesn’t matter what team they played for.   So pick up a biography on one of the greats like Mario Lemieux or Wayne Gretzky.

We even have fiction for adults and kids that revolve around the game like Rachel Gibson's Chinook Hockey Team series and Luanne Rice's Summer Light.  For the kids we have That’s Hockey by David Bouchard and The Hockey Mystery by Gertrude Chandler Warner.

And if you want to know even more, plan a trip to the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto, Canada---you can plan your trip with Fodor's Toronto.  It's a great place for a summer vacation for kids old and young.

Enjoy the games and GO CAPS!!

Warrenton Library Staff

Friday, May 11, 2012

The Stories We Loved, part 2

Children's Book Week is winding down and we've had fun sharing books library staff love with folks visiting the libraries.   Here are a few more titles recommended by Bealeton Library staff to share with you.

The Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown, illustrated by Clement Hurd, perfectly captures a young bunny’s dreams of grown-up independence and his simultaneous relief at being at home in the loving care of his mother. I remember it as a warm and comforting story. I also loved A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson. It is a classic poetry book for children containing such familiar rhymes as “Rain,” “My Shadow,” “The Swing,” and “The Wind.” Common themes are a child’s discovery of the natural world and dreams of faraway places. “The world is so full of a number of things, I’m sure we should all be as happy as kings” – lines still as true now as when I read them decades ago.

I remember reading the classic Black Beauty by Anna Sewell as a little girl. It was the first book that touched my heart and really opened my eyes to the fact that animals have thoughts and feelings of their own. As a teen I loved to curl up with a scary book by R.L. Stine. I would wait until my dad was in the room before I would pick it up and curl up near him. I was too scared to read them alone. I also loved the Ramona Quimby books by Beverly Cleary; it was so much fun to read about all the trouble she got herself into. I had so much fun as a child pretending I was a girl detective like Nancy Drew; my brother would pretend he was one of the Hardy Boys.

I read and reread Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder; I wanted to be Laura and live with Ma and Pa and explore the new frontier with them. Mr. Pine’s Purple House by Leonard Kessler was a great first introduction to individualism. I also read the Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell over and over again until my copy fell apart, marveling at the fierce independence of Karana. When I felt alone, and I often was as a child, I thought of her strength.

The Search For Delicious by Natalie Babbit was read to me by my 3rd grade teacher and has always been one of my favorites. Goodnight, Mr. Tom by Michelle Magorian was one of the first books about WWII I ever read, one of the first books that ever made me sob, and then go back and read it again. Sam, Bangs, and Moonshine by Evaline Ness a picture book my mom used to read to us. I liked the character and the word Flumadiddle.

Bealeton Branch Library Staff

Monday, May 7, 2012

Best Seller Lists


New York Times 5/6/2012

Hardcover Fiction
1. The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King
2. The Innocent by David Baldacci
3. Calico Joe by John Grisham
4. The Witness by Nora Roberts
5. Crystal Gardens by Amanda Quick
6. Guilty Wives by James Patterson
7. The Lost Years by Mary Higgins Clark
8. Unnatural Acts by Stuart Woods
9. The Shoemaker’s Wife by Adriana Trigiani
10. Sacré Bleu by Christopher Moore
11. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin
12. The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection by Alexander McCall Smith
13. Come Home by Lisa Scottoline
14. Into the Dreaming by Karen Marie Moning
15. Betrayal by Danielle Steel

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Drift by Rachel Maddow
2. Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake by Anna Quindlen
3. Prague Winter by Madeleine Albright
4. Imagine by Jonah Lehrer
5. The President’s Club by Nancy Gibbs & Michael Duffy
6. Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson
7. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
8. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg
9. Mrs. Kennedy and Me by Clint Hill
10. The Big Miss by Hank Haney
11. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
12. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
13. Wild by Cheryl Strayed
14. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
15. Quiet by Susan Cain

Washington Post 5/6/2012
 
Hardcover Fiction
1. The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King
2. The Innocent by David Baldacci
3. Calico Joe by John Grisham
4. The Witness by Nora Roberts
5. The Lost Years by Mary Higgins Clark
6. Guilty Wives by James Patterson
7. Crystal Gardens by Amanda Quick
8. Unnatural Acts by Stuart Woods
9. The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection by Alexander McCall Smith
10. Sacré Bleu by Christopher Moore

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Prague Winter by Madeleine Albright
2. Martha’s American Food by Martha Stewart
3. Drift by Rachel Maddow
4. The Circle Maker Praying Circles … by Mark Batterson
5. The President’s Club by Nancy Gibbs & Michael Duffy
6. Our Iceberg is Melting by John P. Kotter & Hoger Rathgeber
7. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
8. Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake by Anna Quindlen
9. The Laptop Millionaire by Mark Anastasi
10. Imagine by Jonah Lehrer

Friday, May 4, 2012

The Stories We Loved, part 1

Children’s Book Week – a national celebration of children’s literature - begins May 7. Though there are many wonderful books, both new and classic, that deserve mention, the Bealeton staff recommend a few of their favorites.

As a child, I loved Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. My third grade teacher read it the class one chapter at a time and I could not wait to hear what happened next!

Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls is so endearing; I love stories set in "simpler times," where hard work, good values and morals were core. I also loved Who’s a Pest by Crosby Bonsall; it is such a whimsical little story. I have fond memories listening to and learning to read with my mom.

As a child I loved tall tales and folklore. Paul Bunyan, Rip VanWinkle and Uncle Remus’ trickster tales are a few favorites. A fun way to revisit these stories is to check out an audio version, such as Rabbit Ears American Tall Tales with recordings by Angelica Houston, Jonathan Winters, Garrison Keillor and Nicolas Cage.

As a horse-crazy child, I remember reading every Black Stallion book that Walter Farley wrote. Another favorite was King of the Wind by Marguerite Henry. Filled with adventure and passion for horses, these books are still beloved today and I still get sentimental imagining those famous Arabians.

The books I enjoyed as a child were Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak, Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs by Judi Barret, any Nancy Drew book and almost anything by Beverly Cleary and Judy Blume.

Stop by any Fauquier County Public Library - favorite children's books of library staff will be on display - so celebrate Children’s Book Week with us by revisiting a favorite story or discovering a new one!

For more children's book recommendations visit Kiddosphere. Get details on library programs and services for children.

Bealeton Branch Library Staff

Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Book Club Discussions for May

The following books are under discussion at the library in the month of May.  See the library's website for details on meeting dates and times.













• May 1: Conscience by Immanuel Kant (Warrenton Library, Great Books Club)

• May 9: The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark (John Marshall Library, Afternoon Club)

• May 14: Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese (Bealeton Library Book Club)

• May 17: The Dark Horse by Craig Johnson (Warrenton Library, Mystery Book Club)

• May 21: Go Tell It On the Mountain by James Baldwin and/or The Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (Marshall Library, Evening Book Club)