Monday, February 27, 2012

Best Seller Lists


New York Times 2/26/2012

Hardcover Fiction
1. Private Games by James Patterson
2. Kill Shot by Vince Flynn
3. The Wolf Gift by Anne Rice
4. I’ve Got Your Number by Sophie Kinsella
5. Defending Jacob by William Landry
6. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
7. Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James
8. Private: #1 Suspect by James Patterson
9. Home Front by Kristin Hannah
10. Catch Me by Lisa Gardner
11. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
12. The House I Loved by Tatiana de Rosnay
13. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin
14. Taken by Robert Crais
15. Robert Ludlum’s The Janson Command by Paul Garrison

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
2. Ameritopia by Mark Levin
3. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
4. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
5. Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo
6. Once Upon a Secret by Mimi Alford
7. Quiet by Susan Cain
8. Bringing Up Bébé by Paula Druckerman
9. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
10. Hilarity Ensues by Tucker Max
11. Coming Apart by Charles Murray
12. Through My Eyes by Tim Tebow
13. Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
14. That Woman by Anne Sebba
15. All There Is by Dave Isay

Washington Post 2/26/2012
 
Hardcover Fiction
1. Private Games by James Patterson
2. Kill Shot by Vince Flynn
3. I’ve Got Your Number by Sophie Kinsella
4. The Wolf Gift by Anne Rice
5. Defending Jacob by William Landry
6. Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James
7. Private: #1 Suspect by James Patterson
8. Home Front by Kristin Hannah
9. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
10. Catch Me by Lisa Gardner

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Ameritopia by Mark Levin
2. The Start-Up of You by Reid Hoffman
3. Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo
4. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
5. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
6. Quiet by Susan Cain
7. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
8. The End of Illness by David B. Agus
9. The Principles of Knitting by June Hemmons Hiatt
10. Once Upon a Secret by Mimi Alford

Friday, February 24, 2012

Spring Gardening

It’s February, the Christmas holidays are long past, the Groundhog has indicated that there will be six more weeks of winter and tax forms are everywhere. Let’s forget all that and get out the seed and flower catalogs and prepare for SPRING! It’s time now to start planning new beds and plantings, check out the newest tools and equipment, and dream of warm spring days that are perfect for working in the garden.

The January/February issue of Horticulture magazine has a great guide for garden tools both large and small, as well as articles about winter plants, gardens designed for children and garden trees. For vegetable gardeners, the Organic Gardening magazine (December/January issue) features a special review of the different varieties of eggplants, and advice on how to choose hand pruners. Both of these magazines are always chock full of articles, practical advice and creative solutions to garden problems that help enlighten amateur gardeners.

Fine Gardening, another magazine found at the library, emphasizes garden planning and special plantings. The April issue has a special review of Peonies as well as information about planter gardening and pruning.

The Marshall Branch recently received a donation of 3 volumes from, Wild Flowers of the United States, about flowers in south eastern portions of the country. The illustrations and color photographs are beautiful.

Titles recently added to the library’s gardening collection include:

Growing at the Speed of Life: A Year in the Life of My First Kitchen Garden by Graham Kerr
Armitage's Garden Perennials by A.M. Armitage

Quick and Easy Curb Appeal a Better Homes and Gardens publication

Enjoy these and many other books, magazines and DVDs available at the library for first time gardeners as well as seasoned pros.

Mary @ Warrenton

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 2/19/2012

Hardcover Fiction
1. Kill Shot by Vince Flynn
2. Catch Me by Lisa Gardner
3. Defending Jacob by William Landry
4. Private: #1 Suspect by James Patterson
5. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
6. Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James
7. Home Front by Kristin Hannah
8. Taken by Robert Crais
9. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
10. Left for Dead by J. A. Jance
11. Raylan by Elmore Leonard
12. No Mark Upon Her by Deborah Crombie
13. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin
14. The Litigators by John Grisham
15. The Fear Index by Robert Harris

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Ameritopia by Mark Levin
2. Hilarity Ensues by Tucker Max
3. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
4. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
5. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
6. Quiet by Susan Cain
7. Once Upon a Secret by Mimi Alford
8. Bringing Up Bébé by Paula Druckerman
9. Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo
10. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
11. Through My Eyes by Tim Tebow
12. Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
13. Coming Apart by Charles Murray
14. The Science of Yoga by William J. Broad
15. Ali in Wonderland by Ali Wentworth

Washington Post 2/19/2012
 
Hardcover Fiction
1. Kill Shot by Vince Flynn
2. Defending Jacob by William Landry
3. Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James
4. Private: #1 Suspect by James Patterson
5. Catch Me by Lisa Gardner
6. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
7. Locked On by Tom Clancy
8. The Fear Index by Robert Harris
9. Taken by Robert Crais
10. No Mark Upon Her by Deborah Crombie

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Ameritopia by Mark Levin
2. The End of Illness by David B. Agus
3. Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo
4. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
5. Once Upon a Secret by Mimi Alford
6. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
7. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
8. Bringing Up Bébé by Paula Druckerman
9. Quiet by Susan Cain
10. Hilarity Ensues by Tucker Max

Monday, February 13, 2012

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 2/12/2012

Hardcover Fiction
1. Home Front by Kristin Hannah
2. Private: #1 Suspect by James Patterson
3. Taken by Robert Crais
4. Defending Jacob by William Landry
5. Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James
6. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
7. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
8. Believing the Lie by Elizabeth George
9. Raylan by Elmore Leonard
10. The Litigators by John Grisham
11. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin
12. The Fear Index by Robert Harris
13. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain
14. The Best of Me by Nicholas Sparks
15. The Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
2. Ameritopia by Mark Levin
3. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
4. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
5. Quiet by Susan Cain
6. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
7. Through My Eyes by Tim Tebow
8. Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
9. Coming Apart by Charles Murray
10. Fairy Tale Interrupted by RoseMarie Terenzio
11. Elizabeth the Queen by Sally Bedell Smith
12. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
13. Strategic Vision by Zbigniew Brzezinski
14. Greedy Bastards by Dylan Ratigan
15. Catherine the Great by Robert K. Massie

Washington Post 2/12/2012
 
Hardcover Fiction
1. Private: #1 Suspect by James Patterson
2. Home Front by Kristin Hannah
3. Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James
4. Believing the Lie by Elizabeth George
5. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
6. The Litigators by John Grisham
7. The Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson
8. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
9. Defending Jacob by William Landry
10. The Fear Index by Robert Harris

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Ameritopia by Mark Levin
2. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
3. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
4. Final Fantasy XIII-2
5. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
6. Coming Apart by Charles Murray
7. Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
8. Strategic Vision by Zbigniew Brzezinski
9. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
10. Quiet by Susan Cain

Friday, February 10, 2012

"Is Little Dorrit Dead?"

Charles Dickens (whose 200th birthday we are celebrating this month) published his works serially, usually in  monthly installments. Dickens' talent for writing each episode as a cliffhanger made each successive episode wildly anticpated.   It was evident with the success of  The Pickwick Papers, (1836) that serialized fiction was a viable and popular format.

In fact, it's said that readers clambored so for the next installment of Little Dorrit that eager fans crowded the docks of Boston Harbor and yelled out to those on board the ship, "Is Little Dorrit dead?" (Although I've also seen this story attributed to the tale of Little Nell from The Old Curiosity Shop and New York Harbor)  

Among his best-known works, originally published as serials, are Great Expectations, David Copperfield, Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, Bleak House, and Nicholas Nickleby.

In much the same way, we at the library often field questions about when the next title in a popular series is due to come out.  While not published serially in montly publications, series fiction (which sometimes comes out annually or less often) has been popular for a long time and I am sure will remain so.

I have recently discovered the Flavia De Luce mysteries by Alan Bradley and am currently listening to the third in the series--A Red Herring Without Mustard.  These books, especially the recorded version, are a real treat.  Flavia, the protagonist,  is a precocious child with a penchant for chemistry and a passion for poisons.  The reader, actress Jayne Entwistle, does an amazing job of bringing these books to life.

I took a quick poll of library staff to see what other series are popular with them and with library patrons.  Here follow a selection of series from the results of that poll:
Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter series by Laurell Hamilton:  In the first of this series, Blake, a.k.a "The Executioner" is hired by the most powerful vampire in the city to hunt down someone who is killing innocent vampires.

Elm Creek Quilts series by Jennifer Chiaverini:  Highlighting the relationships of women in a small community, this series is a gently read.  The author, a quilter herself, has also created  quilt patterns inspired by the novels.

Ghostwalkers series by Christine Feehan: Catergorized as "romance suspense fiction" in the library catalog, this series by Feehan features Ghostwalkers---highly trained military men whose psychic powers have been enhanced by Dr. Peter Whitney, a brilliant and wealthy scientist--- and strong,capable heroines who work side by side to survive in very dangerous situations.

Ian Rutledge series by Charles Todd:  Inspector Ian Rutledge is a shell shocked WWI veteran who returns to his job at Scotland Yard post war.  Todd is also the author of the Bess Crawford series, which takes place during this WWI era as well. 

Ladies of Covington series by Joan Medlicott:   Friends, Grace, Amelia and Hannah decide that the last thing they want to do is live out their lives in a group home, and so, to the dismay of their children, they pool their resources and move to Covington, North Carolina.  This series chronicles their new lives. 

Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear:  Also set during the interim between the two great wars, Maisie, a former housemaid and army nurse, sets up shop as a private investigator.

September 11th series by Karen Kingsbury:  In these volumes, Christian author, Kingsbury follows the lives of people touched and scarred by the tragedy of 9/11.

Serge Storm series by Tim Dorsey:  While this author's work might not be everyone's cup of tea, if you are a fan of the black comedy genre or the Dexter Morgan series (which is also a television series titled  Dexter), you might enjoy Dorsey's work.

Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell:  This highly popular series chronicles the military career of Richard Sharpe, born a "guttersnipe" in London, who becomes an officer in the British Army during the Napoleanic Wars.

Shenandoah Album series by Emilie Richards:  Set in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley, these novel novels explore relationships, families, and faith.

Shopaholic series by Sophie KinsellaConfessions of a Shopaholic, #1 in the series, was released as a motion picture in 2009 starring actress Isla Fisher.  The series follows the life and love of Becky Bloomwood, financial advisor and shopping addict.

Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon:  According to the author, this series came about by accident which she describes as "historical fiction ala James Michener or James Clavell.  Interestingly, the books are written in such a way that they can be read independently of one another and don't necessarily need to be read in succession. 

These series are just the tip of the iceberg.  For more suggestions delve into Readers' Tools on the library's website.  You'll find book lists and databases to help you find just the right book to read next---or stop by and talk to library staff, we love exchanging the titles of favorite reads.


Dawn @ Warrenton with lots of help from Fauquier Library Staff

Thursday, February 9, 2012

E-Readers and Tablets

Thinking about buying an e-reader?  Check out the February 2012 issue of Consumer Reports magazine for reviews on 14 of the most popular e-readers on the market today, including the Amazon Kindle, the Barnes & Noble Nook, the Kobo eReader, and the Sony Reader.

Or, are you thinking about buying a tablet?  Check out the ratings for 36 low-cost tablets.

For those of you not familiar with Consumer Reports, it is a monthly magazine that publishes reviews and ratings for a wide range of consumer  products.  For example, the February issue also has reviews and ratings for:
  • 100-watt CFL and halogen lightbulbs
  • Banking fees and features for the ten largest banks (by assets) and five largest credit unions (by assets)
  • Elliptical exercise machines
  • Pedometers
  • Water filters
  • Snowblowers
  • The best new-car values, from small cars to SUVs to full-sized pickups
Each branch of the Fauquier County Library has the print issues of Consumer Reports from 2009 up to the current issue.  The Find It Virginia online databases have an index to the issues from February 1, 1976 to the current issue, and the full-text of the reviews from January 1, 1999 to June 1, 2009.  You can access Find It Virginia from any library computer, or from home with your valid Fauquier County Library card number.


Fauquier County Public Library Reference Staff

Monday, February 6, 2012

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 2/5/2012

Hardcover Fiction
1. Taken by Robert Crais
2. Private: #1 Suspect by James Patterson
3. Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James
4. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
5. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
6. Believing the Lie by Elizabeth George
7. Raylan by Elmore Leonard
8. The Litigators by John Grisham
9. Darker After Midnight by Lara Adrian
10. Locked On by Tom Clancy
11. Death of Kings by Bernard Cornwell
12. A Dance With Dragons by George R. R. Martin
13. Pineapple Grenade by Tim Dorsey
14. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain
15. The Best of Me by Nicholas Sparks

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Ameritopia by Mark Levin
2. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
3. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
4. Quiet by Susan Cain
5. Killing Lincoln by Bill O’Reilly
6. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
7. Through My Eyes by Tim Tebow
8. Fairy Tale Interrupted by RoseMarie Terenzio
9. Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
10. Strategic Vision by Zbigniew Brzezinski
11. Elizabeth the Queen by Sally Bedell Smith
12. Catherine the Great by Robert K. Massie
13. All In by Paula Broadwell
14. The Obamas by Jodi Kantor
15. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson


Washington Post 2/5/2012

Hardcover Fiction
1. Taken by Robert Crais
2. Private: #1 Suspect by James Patterson
3. Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James
4. All I Did Was Shoot My Man by Walter Mosley
5. Believing the Lie by Elizabeth George
6. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
7. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
8. The Litigators by John Grisham
9. Locked On by Tom Clancy
10. Death of Kings by Bernard Cornwell

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Ameritopia by Mark Levin
2. The Psychology of Wealth by Charles Richards
3. Quiet by Susan Cain
4. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
5. Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
6. All In by Paula Broadwell
7. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
8. American Sniper by Chris Kyle
9. Strategy for You by Rich Horwath
10. Strategic Vision by Zbigniew Brzezinski

Friday, February 3, 2012

Dickens-isms

On February 7, 2012, people world-wide will mark the 200th anniversary of Charles Dickens’ birth and will continue to honor his legacy throughout the year. Dickens, inarguably the most successful author of the Victorian era, not only remains popular today, but has had a lasting influence on western culture.


Picking up Carmen Agra Deedy’s newest juvenile fiction book, The Cheshire Cheese Cat and turning to the first page I read, “He was the best of toms, he was the worst of toms.” The setting is Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese, a London pub frequented by Dickens in the mid-nineteenth century. (And yes – the main character is a cat!) As Alfred Hitchcock shows up in each of his own stories, even more so Dickens appears not only in his books but as a part of the English language. Being labeled a ‘scrooge’ is universally accepted as a negative trait in direct opposition to the far, far better thing Sidney Carton did. And if you thought Joe Friday was the first to ask for ‘just the facts,’ check out the first sentences of Hard Times.

Dickens lived or observed first hand most of the life he wrote about. His father lived beyond his means as did Mr. Micawber, also resulting in time spent in a debtors’ prison. The boot black factory where the 12 year old Dickens worked six days a week, ten and a half hours a day becomes the bottle factory of David Copperfield. A workmate, Bob Fagins, is written into Oliver Twist; his sister Fanny appears in A Christmas Carol. His sister-in-law Mary became David Copperfield’s Agnes; Lucy Manette in A Tale of Two Cities, and had a fate similar to Little Nell in that she died too young.

His environment is portrayed so vividly that “Dickensian England” brings to mind pea-soup fog , poor working conditions, low pay and long hours. How about “butterflies are free?” No, not original to the movie of the same name or to Mark Twain. You got it – Charles Dickens.

As we celebrate the 200th anniversary of Mr. Dickens’ birth in February, come visit the library and try to guess which title the posted quote of the week came from. Prizes will be awarded each week.  You may find his ghost inhabiting surprising parts of your life too!

Quotes will be posted beginning February 6.

Nancy @ Warrenton