Monday, June 27, 2011

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 6/26/2011

Hardcover Fiction
1. Against All Enemies by Tom Clancy
2. One Summer by David Baldacci
3. State of Wonder by Ann Patchett
4. Folly Beach by Dorothea Benton Frank
5. Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver
6. The Kingdom by Clive Cussler
7. Sisterhood Everlasting by Ann Brashares
8. Hit List by Laurell K. Hamilton
9. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson
10. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
11. The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry
12. Buried Prey by John Sandford
13. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
14. Summer Rental by Mary Kay Andrews
15. Dreams of Joy by Lisa See

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Greater Journey by David McCullough
2. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
3. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
4. Demonic by Ann Coulter
5. Seal Team Six by Howard E. Wasdin
6. Bossypants by Tina Fey
7. Through My Eyes by Tim Tebow
8. Those Guys Have All the Fun by James A. Miller
9. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
10. Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
11. On China by Henry Kissinger
12. ____ My Dad Says by Justin Halpern
13. Area 51 by Annie Jacobsen
14. Reckless Endangerment by Gretchen Morgenson
15. The Secret Knowledge by David Mamet

Washington Post 6/26/2011

Hardcover Fiction
1. Against All Enemies by Tom Clancy
2. One Summer by David Baldacci
3. State of Wonder by Ann Patchett
4. The Kingdom by Clive Cussler
5. Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver
6. Bloodmoney by David Ignatius
7. Sisterhood Everlasting by Ann Brashares
8. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
9. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
10. Folly Beach by Dorothea Benton Frank

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Go the ____ to Sleep by Adam Mansbach
2. The Greater Journey by David McCullough
3. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
4. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
5. Those Guys Have All the Fun by James A. Miller
6. Bossypants by Tina Fey
7. Seal Team Six by Howard E. Wasdin
8. Demonic by Ann Coulter
9. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
10. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath

Friday, June 24, 2011

Patricia Cornwell

Cornwell's work as a technical writer and computer analyst for the Chief Medical Examiner for the city of Richmond, Va., gave her the experience and knowledge she needed to break through the world of crime fiction with her the first in her Kay Scarpetta series, Postmortem.   For more crime fiction, check out these authors.

Nevada Barr
Jeffery Deaver


Monday, June 20, 2011

Best Seller Lists


New York Times 6/19/2011

Hardcover Fiction
1. Hit List by Laurell K. Hamilton
2. The Kingdom by Clive Cussler with Grant Blackwood
3. State of Wonder by Ann Patchett
4. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
5. Summer Rental by Mary Kay Andrews
6. Dreams of Joy by Lisa See
7. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
8. Buried Prey by John Sandford
9. The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry
10. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
11. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
12. The Land of Painted Caves by Jean Auel
13. Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson
14. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain
15. The Final Storm by Jeff Shaara

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Greater Journey by David McCullough
2. Demonic by Ann Coulter
3. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
4. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
5. Through My Eyes by Tim Tebow with Nathan Whitaker
6. Bossypants by Tina Fey
7. Those Guys Have All the Fun by James A. Miller
8. Seal Team Six by Howard E. Wasdin and Stephen Templin
9. Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
10. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
11. Area 51 by Annie Jacobsen
12. The Secret Knowledge by David Mamet
13. Reckless Endangerment by Gretchen Morgenson
14. Stories I Only Tell My Friends by Rob Lowe
15. Lady Blue Eyes by Barbara Sinatra
 
Washington Post 6/19/2011
 
Hardcover Fiction
1. State of Wonder by Ann Patchett
2. The Kingdom by Clive Cussler with Grant Blackwood
3. Hit List by Laurell K. Hamilton
4. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
5. Bloodmoney by David Ignatius
6. Summer Rental by Mary Kay Andrews
7. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
8. Dreams of Joy by Lisa See
9. Buried Prey by John Sandford
10. The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Greater Journey by David McCullough
2. Bossypants by Tina Fey
3. Demonic by Ann Coulter
4. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
5. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
6. Those Guys Have All the Fun by James A. Miller
7. The Heart of a Volunteer by Dan Zadra
8. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
9. On China by Henry Kissinger
10. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler


Friday, June 17, 2011

A Song in My Heart

Just as readers are often partial to one genre or prefer nonfiction to fiction, music lovers might also have favorite reads. Some love opera, some prefer jazz. Possibly due to my father’s untalented attempts to soothe me as a child with tunes from Broadway shows, I love musicals.

Two recent books have made me realize that the ideas for musicals do not usually just spring into the minds of their composers. Composers, lyricists, producers and directors are sometimes inspired by something they read, often a book or other literary work.

In Finishing the Hat, Stephen Sondheim shares details about the source, development and final production of his early musicals, including Gypsy, Follies and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.

In Michener’s South Pacific, Stephen J. May explains how James Michener’s experience in World War II led him to write Tales of the South Pacific and how this book became the basis for one of America’s favorite musicals, South Pacific.

Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber often drew on literary sources for inspiration. For romance, passion and danger we can enjoy his Phantom of the Opera, which is based on the work of the same name by Gaston Leroux. For an intriguing mix of lightheartedness and poignancy, Webber turned to Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats by T. S. Eliot and created his much-loved musical, Cats.

Lionel Bart’s Oliver! was inspired by Charles Dickens’ classic, Oliver Twist. Even Victor Hugo’s monumental classic, Les Miserables, was given life on the musical stage by Claude-Michel Schonberg and Alain Boublil.

Leonard Bernstein and friends created my all-time favorite musical, Candide, based on the work of the same name by Voltaire. Bernstein also knew that Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet could be transferred to the streets of New York City with rival gangs, the Jets and the Sharks, standing in for the feuding Capulets and Montagues in West Side Story.

Mary Poppins was a character in a series of books by P. L. Travers long before she was given songs to sing by Robert and Richard Sherman. J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan became a musical at the hands of Mark "Moose" 
Charlap, Jule Styne and friends in 1954. And the age-old fairy tale of Beauty and the Beast is enhanced by the songs of Howard Ashman and Alan Menken.

You can find all of these works in the library’s collection in a variety of formats: book, music CD and DVD. Although I inherited my dad’s lack of musical talent, these composers and lyricists have helped me keep a song in my heart. But if this music is not your cup of tea, you can always read the book!


Maryellen @ Warrenton Library

Monday, June 13, 2011

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 6/12/2011

Hardcover Fiction
1. Dreams of Joy by Lisa See
2. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
3. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson
4. Buried Prey by John Sandford
5. The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry
6. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
7. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
8. The Land of Painted Caves by Jean Auel
9. Kiss of Snow by Nalini Singh
10. Trader of Secrets by Steve Martini
11. Conviction by Aaron Allston
12. Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks
13. The Snowman by Jo Nesbø
14. The Final Storm by Jeff Shaara
15. Sixkill by Robert B. Parker

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Greater Journey by David McCullough
2. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
3. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
4. Bossypants by Tina Fey
5. Those Guys Have All the Fun by James A. Miller
6. Through My Eyes by Tim Tebow
7. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
8. Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
9. Seal Team Six by Howard E. Wasdin and Stephen Templin
10. Area 51 by Annie Jacobsen
11. On China by Henry Kissinger
12. The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson
13. Stories I Only Tell My Friends by Rob Lowe
14. Incognito by David Eagleman
15. Lady Blue Eyes by Barbara Sinatra

Washington Post 6/12/2011
 
Hardcover Fiction
1. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson 
2. Dreams of Joy by Lisa See
3. Bloodmoney by David Ignatius
4. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
5. Buried Prey by John Sandford
6. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
7. The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry
8. The Final Storm by Jeff Shaara
9. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
10. The Snowman by Jo Nesbø

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Greater Journey by David McCullough
2. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
3. Bossypants by Tina Fey
4. Those Guys Have All the Fun by James A. Miller
5. Go the ---- to Sleep by Adam Mansbach
6. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
7. Poisoned by Jeff Benedict
8. Transcendence by Norman E. osenthal
9. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath
10. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler

Friday, June 10, 2011

Canine Connections

I am a cat person. I choose to live with cats because they are relatively low maintenance. Put out the food, scoop out the litter pan, provide a cozy place to sleep, some sunshine and the company of at least one other cat and they are happy. They prefer, in fact, that any further human interference be kept to a minimum. I also like cats because they often can be found in libraries, for example Dewey: the Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World by Vicki Myron.  (Or our own lovable library cat, Ernie, who resides at the Bealeton Library)

Dogs, on the other hand, are seldom found in libraries (except for our Paws to Read buddies). Furthermore, they require much more attention from their human companions as Caroline Knapp discusses in Pack of Two: the Intricate Bond Between People and Dogs. Another recent book that discusses the ancient and complicated relationships between humans and other animals, including dogs, is Wayne Pacelle’s The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend Them.

Because I am not a dog person I’m always surprised when I find books with dogs in them that I really like (in some cases, really love!). One of these is The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. I’ve been told that another good read for dog people is The Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski.

There are many mysteries that will also appeal to dog people. Spencer Quinn writes the Chet and Bernie series, Chet being a great dog and Bernie being his human companion and the owner of the Little Detective Agency. Dog On It, Thereby Hangs a Tail and To Fetch a Thief are also available on CD, and have an excellent narrator.

Other dog people who write mysteries are Donna Ball (Raine Stockton dog mystery series), Susan Conant (Dog Lovers Mystery series) and David Rosenfelt (Andy Carpenter legal mystery series). Martha Grimes often has animals appear in her Richard Jury series. In one of my favorites, The Old Wine Shades, the reader knows that the dog knows who did it; the dog just can’t understand why the humans are so slow to figure it out.

The library has a wealth of material about dogs, everything from how to train your new puppy to dogs in art. Check out an issue of Dog Fancy magazine for good articles and lots of pictures. There are even DVDs like Dogs Decoded and Dogs That Changed the World.

I speak from personal experience when I say that even a cat person, with the help of a good book, can learn to appreciate the charms of our canine companions.

Maryellen @ Warrenton

Monday, June 6, 2011

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 6/5/2011

Hardcover Fiction
1. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
2. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
3. Conviction by Aaron Allston
4. Buried Prey by John Sandford
5. The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry
6. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
7. The Land of Painted Caves by Jean Auel
8. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
9. The Snowman by Jo Nesbø
10. The Final Storm by Jeff Shaara
11. Sixkill by Robert B. Parker
12. Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks
13. The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly
14. 2030 by Albert Brooks
15. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Those Guys Have All the Fun by James A. Miller & Tom Shales
2. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
3. The Greater Journey by David McCullough
4. Bossypants by Tina Fey
5. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
6. Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
7. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
8. Seal Team Six by Howard E. Wasdin and Stephen Templin
9. Area 51 by Annie Jacobsen
10. The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson
11. Stories I Only Tell My Friends by Rob Lowe
12. On China by Henry Kissinger
13. Blind Allegiance to Sarah Palin by Ken Morris
14. Where’s the Birth Certificate? by Jerome R. Corsi
15. The Heart and the Fist by Eric Greitens

Washington Post 6/5/2011
 
Hardcover Fiction
1. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
2. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
3. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
4. The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry
5. Buried Prey by John Sandford
6. Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks
7. Conviction by Aaron Allston
8. The Final Storm by Jeff Shaara
9. The Snowman by Jo Nesbø
10. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. The Greater Journey by David McCullough
2. Those Guys Have All the Fun by James A. Miller & Tom Shales
3. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
4. Bossypants by Tina Fey
5. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
6. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
7. Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
8. God without Religion by Andrew Farley
9. On China by Henry Kissinger
10. The Dukan Diet by Pierre Dukan

Friday, June 3, 2011

That's Sporting! volume II

Looking for adventure, excitement, inspiration, and controversy? Check out the world of sports literature and film. From biographies of larger than life figures to chronicles of sports’s greatest moments, sports-related books and movies feature some of the most amazing stories you’ll ever encounter.

Last week I wrote about some great sports themed books---this week, let's check out the movies! 

Bend It Like Beckham:
Want a movie that will make you smile? Check out this movie about a British-Indian soccer-obsessed teen and her bewildered immigrant parents. It’s the old tale of Western children vs. their immigrant parents, and it’s done very well. It’s sweet, funny, thoughtful, and without much of the angst that accompanies similarly-themed movies (and books). Rated PG-13.
 
The Blind Side:
 If you haven’t seen this remarkable story about a homeless football playing teen and his adoptive family, you should check it out the next time you’re in the mood for a great story. This features Sandra Bullock’s Oscar-winning role. If the movie is checked out, bide your time while reading the book of the same name. Rated PG-13.
 
Chariots of Fire:
Can’t you hear the theme music running in your head? This is the uplifting story of two British track-and-field athletes who are running for more than just medals.
 
Cool Runnings:
If you’re having a crummy day, pop in this movie. You can’t be down while watching this fun film about Jamaican bobsledders determined to make it to the Olympics. Plus, there's a local connection.  Warrenton Mayor George Fitch was a co-founder of the Jamaican bobsled team.  Rated PG.
 
Field of Dreams:
“If you build it, he will come.” This movie about an Iowa farmer who builds a baseball field in his cornfield is a happy tearjerker. Like the best sports movies, it’s more than just about the game. You may also be interested in reading Shoeless Joe by W.P. Kinsella, upon which the book is based. Rated PG.
 
Jerry Maguire:
Showing a more cynical side of the sports world than the starry-eyed titles on this list, this story of a sports agent who loses his job after questioning its purpose is one of Tom Cruise’s best movies. Also features Cuba Gooding Jr. in his Oscar-winning role and a young Renee Zellweger, as well as lines that everyone quoted in the 90s until they ceased to be funny or endearing (“Help me help you,” “You had me at hello,” and, of course, “Show me the money!”). Rated R.
 
National Velvet:
If you’re looking for something for the whole family, National Velvet should do quite nicely. This features Elizabeth Taylor in one of her most memorable performances as an equestrian and her beloved horse. You may also be interested in the book. Rated G.
 
Rocky:
Don’t sneer! There’s a reason why audiences went crazy for this movie-it has a lot of heart, a kicking soundtrack, and a breakout star. Skip the sequels, even though Mr. T may pity you. Rated PG.

And don't forget the popcorn!  Enjoy.

Jennifer@Warrenton