Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Best Seller Lists



New York Times
5/29/2011
Hardcover Fiction

1. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
2. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
3. Buried Prey by John Sandford
4. The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry
5. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
6. The Final Storm by Jeff Shaara
7. The Land of Painted Caves by Jean Auel
8. Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks
9. Sixkill by Robert B. Parker
10. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
11. The Snowman by Jo Nesbø
12. The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly
13. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain
14. 2030 by Albert Brooks
15. I’ll Walk Alone by Mary Higgins Clark

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
2. Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
3. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
4. Seal Team Six by Howard E. Wasdin and Stephen Templin
5. Bossypants by Tina Fey
6. Where’s the Birth Certificate? by Jerome R. Corsi
7. Area 51 by Annie Jacobsen
8. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
9. Stories I Only Tell My Friends by Rob Lowe
10. The Heart and the Fist by Eric Greitens
11. The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson
12. On China by Henry Kissinger
13. From This Moment On by Shania Twain
14. If You Ask Me (And Of Course You Won’t) by Betty White
15. To End All Wars by Adam Hochschild

Washington Post
5/29/2011
Hardcover Fiction

1. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
2. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
3. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
4. The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry
5. Buried Prey by John Sandford
6. The Final Storm by Jeff Shaara
7. Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks
8. The Snowman by Jo Nesbø
9. The Land of Painted Caves by Jean Auel
10. Sixkill by Robert B. Parker

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Berlin 1961 by Frederick Kempe
2. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
3. Bossypants by Tina Fey
4. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
5. On China by Henry Kissinger
6. Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
7. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
8. Seal Team Six by Howard E. Wasdin and Stephen Templin
9. The Dukan Diet by Pierre Dukan
10. Where’s the Birth Certificate? by Jerome R. Corsi

Friday, May 27, 2011

That's Sporting! volume I

Looking for adventure, excitement, inspiration, and controversy? Check out the world of sports literature and film. From biographies of larger than life figures to chronicles of sports’s greatest moments, sports-related books and movies feature some of the most amazing stories you’ll ever encounter.

Here are several of my favorites books:

The Bambino had an enormous appetite for baseball, food, being a celebrity, alcohol, women, and life, which means that he makes for a fascinating biography. As a former senior writer for Sports Illustrated, Montville’s engrossing writing is well-matched for such an icon, warts and all.

Coming Back Stronger by Drew Brees:
I can’t discuss sports without mentioning my New Orleans Saints! Drew Brees’s account of overcoming his potentially career-ending injury and playing for the Saints during the first post-Katrina season is inspirational and heartfelt.

Friday Night Lights: A Town, A Team, And a Dream by H.G. Bissinger:
The critically acclaimed (and recently cancelled) television show of the same name was inspired by this chronicle of a high school football team in a depressed Texas town. Like many Texas football championship teams, the football team is the center of the town’s social life on Friday evenings. Bissinger’s portrayal of the team and the town are engaging and unforgettable.

Hate Mail From Cheerleaders by Rich Reilly:
Although Rick Reilly occasionally wrote about sports stars in his popular Sports Illustrated column, his best columns were often about everyday people in the sports world with inspirational stories—from unlikely teenage champions to those behind the scenes. At times incensed, at times uplifting, and at all times thoughtful or funny (and sometimes both), Hate Mail From Cheerleaders is a prime example of excellence in sports journalism; compelling storytelling that even non sports fans can enjoy.

As an ice skating and gymnastics fan, Little Girls in Pretty Boxes troubled and saddened me. Joan Ryan reveals the occasionally desperate and dangerous methods young skaters and gymnasts will take to reach the top. This was controversial in the skating and gymnastics worlds when it was first published in 2000.

While Lou Gehrig wasn’t initially as popular as the more gregarious Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio, his solid and steady prowess coupled with his public dignity in the face of an incurable disease have endeared him to generations of fans. It would have been easy to idolize Gehrig at the expense of forgetting that he was human; Jonathan Eig presents a fully-fleshed portrait of the great player struck down entirely too soon in his career.


Clarke knows NASCAR like the back of her hand; her extensive knowledge and working relationships with NASCAR drivers informed the Washington Post sports journalist’s fascinating look at the sport’s rise to fame.

Rome 1960: The Olympics That Changed the World by David Maraniss:
Why were the 1960 Olympics so world-changing? They were the first televised Olympics. The Cold War was heating up, with American and Soviet athletes competing for more than just medals. The first doping scandal happened in the 1960 Olympics. And viewers witnessed Cassius Clay (later Mohammad Ali) and Wilma Rudolph reigning victorious in their events. You won’t be able to put this one down; gripping storytelling.

For more sports-related nonfiction books, check out the 796-799 section, which also includes many how-to manuals.  And tune in next week to catch a glimpse of some great sports movies from the library!


Jennifer @ Warrenton

Monday, May 23, 2011

Best Seller Lists

New York Times  5/22/2011

Hardcover Fiction

1. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
2. Buried Prey by John Sandford
3. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
4. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
5. The Land of Painted Caves by Jean Auel
6. Sixkill by Robert B. Parker
7. Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks
8. The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly
9. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson
10. The Snowman by Jo Nesbø
11. Those in Peril by Wilbur Smith
12. Bel-Air Dead by Stuart Woods
13. I’ll Walk Alone by Mary Higgins Clark
14. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain
15. Chasing Fire by Nora Roberts

Hardcover Nonfiction

1. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
2. Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
3. Bossypants by Tina Fey
4. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
5. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
6. Seal Team Six by Howard E. Wasdin and Stephen Templin
7. Stories I Only Tell My Friends by Rob Lowe
8. If You Ask Me (And Of Course You Won’t) by Betty White
9. From This Moment On by Shania Twain
10. The Heart and the Fist by Eric Greitens
11. My Lucky Life In and Out of Show Business by Dick Van Dyke
12. She Walks in Beauty edited by Caroline Kennedy
13. This is a Book by Demetri Martin
14. A Singular Woman by Janny Scott
15. The Notes by Ronald Reagan

Washington Post 5/22/2011
Hardcover Fiction

1. Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris
2. Buried Prey by John Sandford
3. 10th Anniversary by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro
4. The Sixth Man by David Baldacci
5. The Snowman by Jo Nesbø
6. Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks
7. Sixkill by Robert B. Parker
8. The Land of Painted Caves by Jean Auel
9. The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly
10. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson

Hardcover Nonfiction

1. Bossypants by Tina Fey
2. Berlin 1961 by Frederick Kempe NOTE: Library has CD book
3. The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth by Alexandra Robbins
4. Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me by Chelsea Handler
5. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
6. This is a Book by Demetri Martin
7. Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
8. The Dukan Diet by Pierre Dukan
9. Unbroken by Lara Hillenbrand
10. The 17 Day Diet by Dr. Mike Moreno

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Janet Evanovich Read-Alikes

Janet Evanovich, best known for her Stephanie Plum series, mixes mystery with a pinch of romance and a dash of humor to produce novels sure to entertain. Here are some other authors who follow her recipe.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Reading Potpourri 2

Should a book store sell all sorts of materials? Or can the owners choose to be selective and only serve a portion of the population, i.e., elite/intellectual readers? This premise is put forth in the novel A Novel Bookstore in which an entire French village protests and begins harassing a bookstore owner. Don't we have Politics and Prose and The Mystery Bookstore and other similar shops? They all have their own selections.

Laurence Cosse', the author and owner of The Good Novel Bookstore, sets forth a very interesting premise with this novel ... and has spawned other similar style and successful bookstores internationally.

If you like reading about food and people then you'll enjoy 97 Orchard by Jane Ziegelman. In this book the author profiles five families from five different nationalities living in lower east side Manhattan from the 1860s through the 1920s. As time passed, these families may have changed their dress and speech, some of their customs, and learned American ways, but their food speaks of speaks of their homes and homelands. Ziegelman uses explanations of food, including recipes, and anecdotes to show how the immigrants adjusted to their new country.

If you're up for some travel reading try one of the following titles:
These books will take you to places you may have never dreamed of going. You'll read of insects, foods, sleep, and temperatures you may not want to think of again. Each book is a fantastic read in itself. No matter what the weather here, you can be travelling via your sofa. Buckle up and enjoy!

Kathryn @ Warrenton

Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Reading Potpourri 1

If you enjoy reading something with a lot of visuals try Clara and Mr. Tiffany by Susan Vreeland. This recent novel about Clara Driscoll, a young woman who worked for Louis C.Tiffany in his New York glassworks firm, gives a picture of the day to day life in that city. In particular it highlights the immigrant communities and hardships faced by women who lived in NYC during the later 19th and early 20th centuries.

Clara and Mr. Tiffany includes a lot of description of the varied and famous pieces of art glass, windows and lampshades designed by the Tiffany Firm. Vreeland also descrives how each piece of the glass is made by color and texture, with the artist knowing where it will go into the mosaic pattern of the design. Two complimentary titles to Vreeland's fictional work, one shelved in the library's oversized section, include color plates of the works.

If you enjoy reading about things a little more wild and crazy, read The Wave by Susan Casey. This is all about those "rogue waves" that happen around the world and can't be predicted. They swallow ships whole, never to be seen again. There are also many chapters on surfers who travel around the Pacific looking for the biggest waves to get the ultimate rides. Casey explains the science behind these waves. It's very interesting and might just be your cup of tea.

Have you ever wondered how we learn? And how animals think? If so, read Ape House by Sara Gruen. The studies being done with bonobo apes, teaching them to understand spoken language and communicate with us, provide for a thoroughly entertaining novel. Gruen interweaves research through the story, so you begin to understand how human these apes are and how we are so similar to them. The apes live in a "house" situation, have a family, show emotions, have their own computer with symbols and type to converse. This is all based on present day research. Sometimes we wish we could have so much communication with our own teens!

Gruen's last book, Water for Elephants, was a big hit with many people. I'm curious to see what she writes about next.


Kathryn @ Warrenton