Thursday, August 28, 2014

Stay Up With a Good Book at the National Book Festival - or Your Local Library

Saturday, August 30th marks the 14th year of the Library of Congress National Book Festival. The theme for this free public festival is “Stay up with a Good Book."  Past years the festival has been held over two days on the National Mall, but this year’s event will take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC, on one day from 10 am to 10 pm. Several evening events are planned, with a poetry slam, a “Great Books to Great Movies” session and for those graphic novel fans a “super-session." President and Mrs. Obama are the Honorary Chairs for this year’s festival.

Dread the traffic and parking hassles of getting into DC? Stop by any Fauquier County Public Library. We've got you covered with a wide selection of books by authors participating in the festival! 

Check out our book display at the Warrenton Library featuring authors participating in the National Book Festival. Here is just a sampling of what will be on display:



 by Ishmael Beah





by Kai Bird





by Doris Kearns Goodwin



by Carla Hall.





by Claire Messud





by Lisa See




From culinary arts to biographies, poetry and graphic novels, we have what you are looking for. We also have access to online resources including:
Jody @ Warrenton Library

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collectionevents or programs, visit us on FacebookTwitter (Kiddosphere Twitter is here) or online.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 8/24/2014

Hardcover Fiction
1. Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami
2. Love Letters, by Debbie Macomber
3. The 6th Extinction, by James Rollins
4. Big Little Lies, by Liane Moriarty
5. The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt
6. The Heist, by Daniel Silva
7. The Book of Life, by Deborah Harkness
8. All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
9. The Lost Island, by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child
10. The Magician’s Land, by Lev Grossman
11. Tom Clancy: Support and Defend, by Mark Greaney
12. The Silkworm, by Robert Galbraith
13. Fool’s Assassin, by Robin Hobb
14. Written in My Own Heart’s Blood, by Diana Gabaldon
15. The Husband’s Secret, by Liane Moriarty

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. America, by Dinesh D’Souza
2. One Nation, by Ben Carson & Candy Carson
3. In the Kingdom of Ice, by Hampton Sides
4. The First Family Detail, by Ronald Kessler
5. David and Goliath, by Malcolm Gladwell
6. A Spy Among Friends, by Ben Macintyre
7. Hard Choices, by Hillary Rodham Clinton
8. Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand
9. Blood Feud, by Edward Klein
10. The Invisible Bridge, by Rick Perlstein
11. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty
12. I Am Malala, by Malala Yousafzai
13. Think Like a Freak, by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner
14. The Mockingbird Next Door, by Marja Mills
15. Taking the Lead, by Derek Hough

Washington Post 8/24/2014

Hardcover Fiction
1. Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami
2. Love Letters, by Debbie Macomber
3. The 6th Extinction, by James Rollins
4. Big Little Lies, by Liane Moriarty
5. The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt
6. Tom Clancy: Support and Defend, by Mark Greaney
7. The Heist, by Daniel Silva
8. A Perfect Life, by Danielle Steel
9. All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
10. Top Secret, by W. E. B. Griffin & William E. Butterworth IV

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Strengths Finder 2.0, by Tom Rath
2. America, by Dinesh D’Souza
3. One Nation, by Ben Carson & Candy Carson
4. Great by Choice, by Jim Collins & Morten T. Hansen
5. Assault and Flattery, by Katie Pavlich
6. Mayor for Life, by Marion Barry, Jr.
7. My Drunk Kitchen, by Hannah Hart
8. In the Kingdom of Ice, by Hampton Sides
9. Fountainhead of Jihad, by Vahid Brown & Don Rassler
10. Hard Choices, by Hillary Rodham Clinton


To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collectionevents or programs, visit us on FacebookTwitter (Kiddosphere Twitter is here) or online.

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Armchair Travel: A Trip to Japan Starts at Your Library

Greetings! Elizabeth here, Catalogue Librarian at the Fauquier County Public Library.

This past March I got to travel abroad to the #1 destination on my list of places I want to visit: Japan.
The blogger @ Matsumoto Castle 
I am very fortunate to have close friends—an English teacher and her freelance translator husband—who are living in Nagano prefecture and offered me a home base for the two weeks I was there. While in Japan I got to see (and eat!) so many wonderful things and had experiences I will never forget. 

  • Riding the shinkansen (that’s the bullet train) to Tokyo and Kyoto. 
  • Feeding the deer that roam around Nara Park. 
  • Looking out over Kyoto from Kiyomizudera (that’s a Buddhist temple that has a particularly spectacular view; the name means Pure Water Temple). 
  • Getting a strawberry-filled crepe while walking through Harajuku (that’s an artist, fashionable neighborhood in Tokyo). 
  • Staying at a ryokan (that’s a Japanese inn) with onsen (that’s hot spring baths).

It truly was the time of my life!

But even if you can’t make it all the way to the other side of the planet, there are plenty of ways to explore Japan right here at the library.

The travel section is a logical first stop. Even if you aren't planning a trip, travel guidebooks are a great source of information, from geography to history to culture. The books about Japan can be found under Dewey Decimal 915.2. For armchair travel, I recommend the books from DK Eyewitness Travel and National Geographic - they are so full of beautiful color photographs. Check out temples and shrines, mossy green vistas, and the largest city in the world.

If it’s Japanese style homes you wish you could see, head on over to 720.95 for books on architecture and home design. What is Japanese Architecture? by Kazuo Nishi and Kazuo Hozumi is a historical overview. Japanese Style: Designing With Nature's Beauty by Sunamita Lim focuses on aesthetics. Or go to 747.0952 for the interior design side. The Wabi-Sabi House: The Japanese Art of Imperfect Beauty by Robyn Griggs Lawrence describes a particular Japanese aesthetic, wabi-sabi, which an appreciation of objects that are withered and forlorn or austere, quietive, and humble. 

But maybe you’re more interested in outdoor settings; Japan is known for its gorgeous gardens and landscaping. Check out The World of the Japanese Garden: From Chinese Origins to Modern Landscape Art by Loraine Kuck or The Art of the Japanese Garden by David and Michiko Young .

One of the most pleasurable ways to experience another culture is through its food and Japan has a well-deserved reputation in this department. I can honestly say that I didn't eat a single thing I didn't like in Japan; whether it was conveyor belt sushi or kaiseki (a traditional multi-course Japanese dinner), everything was delicious.  Thank goodness for cookbooks! If you are in the mood for a culinary getaway, you can find Japanese cookbooks in 641.5952. Perhaps you’d like to take on the oeuvre of an Iron Chef with Morimoto: The New Art of Japanese Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. I like Japanese Cooking: The Traditions, Techniques, Ingredients and Recipes by Emi Kazuko because it contains not only recipes, but also a plethora of background information about ingredients and cooking techniques used in Japanese cuisine, and is fully illustrated with color photos.

Perhaps you would like to be transported to an animated version of Japan, in which case, you can’t go wrong with a DVD of one of Studio Ghibli’s movies. Spirited Away, My Neighbor Totoro, and Princess Mononoke were all directed by Hayao Miyazaki—often called the Walt Disney of Japan—and showcase breathtaking visuals of Japanese countryside and folklore. If you've never watched a Ghibli movie, don’t let the fact that they are animated deter you; they are excellent! My Neighbor Totoro is appropriate for all ages and Spirited Away for grade school and up, but Princess Mononoke contains some violence and is more suited for teens and adults.

Before I wind up this blog post, there is one more book that I have to recommend to anyone who is interested in Japan, especially those curious about what it is like to travel there. Japan Ai: A Tall Girl’s Adventures in Japan by Aimee Major Steinberger is an illustrated account of the author’s trip to Japan with her friends. I have a copy of this one in my own personal collection and enjoyed it well before I knew I would get the chance to go to Japan myself. Like the author, I am a geek: interested in the pop-cultural products of Japan—anime, manga, and toys—as well as its history, aesthetics, traditions, and language. So a lot of the things Ms. Steinberger wrote and drew about were things I wanted to do as well (and some of them I did). Anyone who has traveled to another country and felt a little out of place can relate to her experiences. They also provide a loving glimpse of Japan from a visitor’s point of view.

Well, that will do for me today. I hope you enjoyed this blog post and will come and see us at the library (even if you aren't looking for any and all things Japanese). Oh, and don’t forget the Japanese language resources, especially if you plan to make the trip in the future; you can find them at 495.6 in both the book section and the CD book section.

Sayonara for now!

Elizabeth @ Warrenton Library 

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 8/17/2014

Hardcover Fiction
1. The Magician’s Land, by Lev Grossman
2. Big Little Lies, by Liane Moriarty
3. The Lost Island, by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child
4. Severed Souls, by Terry Goodkind
5. The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt
6. The Heist, by Daniel Silva
7. The Book of Life, by Deborah Harkness
8. Tom Clancy: Support and Defend, by Mark Greaney
9. All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
10. The Silkworm, by Robert Galbraith
11. A Perfect Life, by Danielle Steel
12. Invisible, by James Patterson & David Ellis
13. Act of War, by Brad Thor
14. Top Secret, by W. E. B. Griffin & William E. Butterworth IV
15. Mr. Mercedes, by Stephen King

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. America, by Dinesh D’Souza
2. One Nation, by Ben Carson & Candy Carson
3. In the Kingdom of Ice, by Hampton Sides
4. The First Family Detail, by Ronald Kessler
5. Hard Choices, by Hillary Rodham Clinton
6. A Spy Among Friends, by Ben Macintyre
7. The Invisible Bridge, by Rick Perlstein
8. Blood Feud, by Edward Klein
9. David and Goliath, by Malcolm Gladwell
10. Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand
11. Taking the Lead, by Derek Hough
12. The Mockingbird Next Door, by Marja Mills
13. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty
14. Think Like a Freak, by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner
15. The Nixon Defense, by John W. Dean

Please Note: The Washington Post Best Seller list did not publish in time for this blog.

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collectionevents or programs, visit us on FacebookTwitter (Kiddosphere Twitter is here) or online.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Consumer Reports August 2014: Best and Worst Fast Food



Most of us like to eat out.  If you're fond of fast food, check out this month's Consumer Reports cover article on "America's Best and Worst Fast Food."  The ratings cover both "national" chains (those operating in six or more states) and some regional chains.  The ratings include categories for healthful choices, top service, fast-food alternatives (fast-casual restaurants such as Jason's Deli and Panera Bread), and clean surroundings. Check to see if your favorite is on any of the lists, good or bad!

Do you plan to take electronic devices with you on vacation?  According to a recent Consumer Reports survey, Americans take three devices with them on vacation, on average.  Check out the recommendations for the types of devices you might want on a vacation--tablet, camera, fitness tracker, etc.  The article also suggests apps that might be useful on a trip--for weather, tracking high and low tides, maps, finding gas stations and restaurants.

Other useful articles in this issue include:
  • Ratings for iced coffee drinks--the ready-to-drink options available at the supermarket
  • Ratings for the best companies to fix a computer
  • Ratings for hospitals that perform heart surgery
  • Ratings for washers, dryers, and laundry detergents
Each branch of the Fauquier County Library has the print issues of Consumer Reports from 2010 up to the current issue. The Find It Virginia databases have an index to the issues from February 1, 1976 to the current issue, and the full-text of the reviews from January 1, 1999 to June 1, 2009. You can access Find It Virginia from any library computer, or from home with your valid Fauquier County Public Library card.

Reference Staff @ Warrenton

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

























To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Best Seller Lists

New York Times 8/10/2014

Hardcover Fiction
1. Big Little Lies, by Liane Moriarty
2. The Heist, by Daniel Silva
3. Tom Clancy: Support and Defend, by Mark Greaney
4. The Book of Life, by Deborah Harkness
5. The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt
6. Fast Track, by Julie Garwood
7. A Perfect Life, by Danielle Steel
8. Act of War, by Brad Thor
9. All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
10. The Silkworm, by Robert Galbraith
11. Invisible, by James Patterson & David Ellis
12. Mr. Mercedes, by Stephen King
13. Magic Breaks, by Ilona Andrews
14. Top Secret Twenty-One, by Janet Evanovich
15. Written in My Own Heart’s Blood, by Diana Gabaldon

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. America, by Dinesh D’Souza
2. A Spy Among Friends, by Ben Macintyre
3. One Nation, by Ben Carson & Candy Carson
4. Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand
5. Hard Choices, by Hillary Rodham Clinton
6. Blood Feud, by Edward Klein
7. David and Goliath, by Malcolm Gladwell
8. The Mockingbird Next Door, by Marja Mills
9. Think Like a Freak, by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner
10. Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty
11. I Am Malala, by Malala Yousafzai
12. Lean In, by Sheryl Sandberg
13. Killing Jesus, by Bill O’Reilly
14. Factory Man, by Beth Macy
15. Things That Matter, by Charles Krauthammer

Washington Post 8/10/2014

Hardcover Fiction
1. Tom Clancy: Support and Defend, by Mark Greaney
2. A Perfect Life, by Danielle Steel
3. The Heist, by Daniel Silva
4. Fast Track, by Julie Garwood
5. Big Little Lies, by Liane Moriarty
6. The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt
7. The Book of Life, by Deborah Harkness
8. All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
9. Invisible, by James Patterson & David Ellis
10. Act of War, by Brad Thor

Hardcover Nonfiction
1. Strengths Finder 2.0, by Tom Rath
2. America, by Dinesh D’Souza
3. The Principal, by Michael Fullan
4. A Spy Among Friends, by Ben Macintyre
5. One Nation, by Ben Carson & Candy Carson
6. Hard Choices, by Hillary Rodham Clinton
7. The Necessity of Strangers, by Alan Gregerman
8. Jesus Calling, by Sarah Young
9. The Confidence Code, by Katty Kay & Claire Shipman
10. Mayor for Life, by Marion Barry, Jr.


To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collectionevents or programs, visit us on FacebookTwitter (Kiddosphere Twitter is here) or online.

Thursday, August 7, 2014

'Cause you got to have friends!

Buddies.
Friends.
BFF's. 

Bette Midler was right: you got to have friends! By whatever name you call them, friends play an important role in our lives. In fact, they play such an important role that in 1935, Congress proclaimed the first Sunday in August National Friendship Day. 

With National Friendship Day in mind, we decided to take a look at the friends of some famous people - authors, performers, athletes and others. One place to start is a biography. When reading a biography, it is fun to find related biographies about other people, alliances and relationships in the person's life. It provides a fuller picture of the place, time and circumstances of their lives. 

To get you started (and to have some fun) here are some people who hung out together, became friends, performed together, or just knew each other from proximity. Can you identify who goes with whom?  In some cases, there’s multiple connections to a person, married couple, or family members. How many of these "buddy biographies" can you figure out? 
Stop by the Warrenton Library beginning Monday, August 11 and check out a display of biographies about many of these individuals. You can also pick up a copy of the answers to the "buddy biography quiz" above. Or watch Book Notes for answers next week. 

"My friends are my estate." - Emily Dickinson

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter (Kiddosphere twitter is hereor online.